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View Full Version : Need help identifying brake setup. Additional question added.



XR7Kurt
04-19-2009, 01:51 PM
I've had my 94 SC for a year now and went to change the brake pads but the front pads I ordered didn't match the ones on the car when I took them off so I thought they sent me the wrong ones. I had never had the wheels off before so didn't notice that the rotors were larger than stock, they are 12" crossdrilled/slotted with a single 2.5" piston caliper. I need to know what these are to get new pads.

Thanks,
Kurt

nickleman60
04-19-2009, 01:56 PM
Are they 12" or 11.5" rotors? If they're 11.5" then you have the 96/97 t-bird sport rotors and calipers or the same thing are the 93-98 Lincoln Mark viii front calipers and rotors. It's a common swap for t-birds and I have them on one of my 94's.

XR7Kurt
04-19-2009, 02:20 PM
I'll check, they're still on the car so I was kind of eyeballing the edges.

XR7Kurt
04-19-2009, 02:32 PM
If they're 11.5" then you have the 96/97 t-bird sport rotors and calipers or the same thing are the 93-98 Lincoln Mark viii front calipers and rotors.
They are 11.5", so I guess that's what I have. Thanks.

XR7Kurt
04-21-2009, 05:46 PM
Is there a difference in the 11.5" set-ups? My Haynes manual has different torques listed for the caliper locating pin. It lists 93-96 at 65ft-lbs and the 97 at 26ftlbs. That's a big difference so is the manual correct and how do I tell which year I have?
Thanks,
Kurt

Mike8675309
04-21-2009, 06:38 PM
Is there a difference in the 11.5" set-ups? My Haynes manual has different torques listed for the caliper locating pin. It lists 93-96 at 65ft-lbs and the 97 at 26ftlbs. That's a big difference so is the manual correct and how do I tell which year I have?
Thanks,
Kurt

My guess is that one is fine thread and the other coarse thread. Either that or one is into aluminum and the other steel. Being honest here, I have absolutely never..never used a torque wrench on bolts for the brake system. It's a bad habit but I have found my forearm is quite calibrated.

I would tighten them to just enough foot pounds.

XR7Kurt
04-21-2009, 07:00 PM
I would tighten them to just enough foot pounds.
Is that the same as 1/4 turn before stripping?

So the coarse threads would be the higher torque, right?

nickleman60
04-21-2009, 07:23 PM
:D
It's a bad habit but I have found my forearm is quite calibrated.

.

It's worked for me for 35 years..................

Mike8675309
04-21-2009, 08:35 PM
Is that the same as 1/4 turn before stripping?

So the coarse threads would be the higher torque, right?

The only threads I've ever been gunshy on are those that are fine threads and machined into hardened steel. I.e. the caliper bolts on a early dodge durango that are threaded into the steering knuckle of axle. It was a bad design, and the threads regularly were pulled out by dealer mechanics, as well as others from over torque. Dodge replaced a bunch of steering knuckles under warranty before they came out with a repair kit using heli-coils.

I've never pulled the threads out of something, but that's because I have a feel for how tight is too tight, and how loose is too loose. It is just something I've developed over time. Mostly from having my dad able to help me know when it's tight enough or too loose. Just like his dad probably taught him and I'm teaching my kids. That said. I did invest in a quality torque wrench, and had it checked at a machine shop with a calibrated unit, before I used the torque wrench to assemble my motor.

Now that doesn't really help you. Basically if you figure out the bolt size, and the threads, you can then figure the right torque with standard torque tables.
http://www.almabolt.com/pages/catalog/bolts/tighteningtorque.htm
http://www.coxhardware.com/usefulinfo/charts/7_btorque.htm