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ghostryder
10-18-2013, 06:58 PM
does anyone have a complete front to rear metal brake line for a 1990 SC with the teves II abs system

thanks
Al.

MadMikeyL
10-18-2013, 08:30 PM
Your best bet is to just bend up a new one. Just buy the brake line itself and the flaring tool, and take your time to match the bends.

ghostryder
10-18-2013, 08:58 PM
how long of a line should I get and what size line? can I change where the bends are to route it a different way

Dirtyd0g
10-18-2013, 10:26 PM
I bend them up for the later cars as I have a set here to copy but the early cars I am not sure are the same.
Alan

ghostryder
10-19-2013, 07:33 AM
I bend them up for the later cars as I have a set here to copy but the early cars I am not sure are the same.
Alanare there specs anywhere for either cars on the brakes lines

ricardoa1
10-19-2013, 10:20 AM
Just cut the rotted section off and bring it to the parts store and get a similar size. Rent the flaring tool. With it you can do single flair or double flair. Find an easy spot on the car to cut it off as you will be flaring the factory line. It might take you a few tries to get the flair to seal properly with the fittings. Try to find a veteran at the parts store to show you how to do it or so a search on youtube to see it in action. Its not hard at all, just time consuming. Especially when you don't get a good seal the first time. You will need to cut and redo till you do.

MadMikeyL
10-19-2013, 02:04 PM
And I would reccomend just buying the tool instead of renting it, since it is only about $20 to buy and this way you will have it if you ever need it again.

ghostryder
10-19-2013, 05:04 PM
i cut that bad section and got some new line and put it in with compression fittings. and it works great no leaks under pressure

Dirtyd0g
10-19-2013, 06:56 PM
compression fittings are not rated to handle the pressure of brakes, in many states if your car is inspected and they are found the car will be removed from the road until proper repairs are made, that is a bad choice.
Alan

Dirtyd0g
10-19-2013, 07:01 PM
are there specs anywhere for either cars on the brakes lines

What do you mean by specs they are all 3/16 line, all the late cars have 10mm bubble flare connections at most points and 12mm bubble flare at others. Early cars had some different sizes.
Alan

ghostryder
10-20-2013, 08:03 AM
my 90 has 1/4 brake line

Dirtyd0g
10-20-2013, 01:05 PM
Yes that is one of the variations, 1/4 that splits to 2 -3/16 lines very common on older cars and trucks.
Most compression fittings around here come with a warnign on the package that they are not rated for brake use, I looked up the PSI specs and the only way they could be is if they were made from stainless steel, brass will burst when you need them most.
Alan

Dirtyd0g
10-20-2013, 01:11 PM
if you search you can find the laws on many states, I have verified new york before but in a recent search maine also has laws against compression fittings, I would assume most states do if you can find them.
http://www.maine.gov/dps/msp/vehicles_inspections/documents/InspectionManual_000.pdf
page 45 section C-8
Alan

CaifanSC
11-02-2015, 03:26 PM
compression fittings are not rated to handle the pressure of brakes, in many states if your car is inspected and they are found the car will be removed from the road until proper repairs are made, that is a bad choice.
Alan

If not compression, what are the alternatives? Do they have to be labeled as brake line fittings?

Considering just patching my leaky line to get me through winter and then replace my leaky line.

PS...Alan...are you still bending brake lines for the later models?

S4gunn
11-02-2015, 06:12 PM
If not compression, what are the alternatives? Do they have to be labeled as brake line fittings?

Considering just patching my leaky line to get me through winter and then replace my leaky line.

PS...Alan...are you still bending brake lines for the later models?

I bought a bunch of these fittings when I was fabricating my fuel rail for a splitport swap on my 3.8L N/A.
http://www.autozone.com/brakes-and-traction-control/brake-line-fittings

They are all SS and are fairly affordable.

I believe Alan is just trying to steer you away from the brass compression fittings you will find at Home Depot/Lowes.

-g

MadMikeyL
11-02-2015, 06:33 PM
Compression fittings should NEVER be used on brakes. Regardless of whether they are brass or stainless, it won't hold up to the pressure of a panic stop. If anyone has compression fittings on their car right now, go to a close by deserted road, get the car up to 50mph, and suddenly slam on the brakes as hard as you can, as though another car just jumped out in front of you, and see what happens. The compression fitting WILL fail and blow out, your brake pedal will drop to the floor, and your stopping distance will be greatly increased. Now imagine if you really were panic stopping because another car, or worse a pedestrian just jumped out in front of you. If you need to section in some brake line, you need to double-flare both ends and use a brake union.

KMT
11-02-2015, 06:36 PM
+1 for flares and unions.

CaifanSC
03-26-2016, 11:15 PM
I bought a bunch of these fittings when I was fabricating my fuel rail for a splitport swap on my 3.8L N/A.
http://www.autozone.com/brakes-and-traction-control/brake-line-fittings

They are all SS and are fairly affordable.

I believe Alan is just trying to steer you away from the brass compression fittings you will find at Home Depot/Lowes.

-g

gotcha, good to know...I got four unions from Autozone so I presume those should be safe to use.