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good to doo
12-10-2013, 12:10 PM
I,ve read here that I should use never seize on the plugs. Should I coat the threads from from top to bottom? thanks all.

old_coot
12-10-2013, 12:14 PM
Lightly coat the treads yes....anytime you are putting a steel screw into aluminum use anti-sieze...I use it on all metal going into aluminum...but it's probably not necessary with brass.....Dan

KMT
12-10-2013, 12:22 PM
Don't use anything that might interfere with heat transfer and grounding or allow excessive torque. The metal plating on the plug already acts as a lube. See http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/pdf/tb-0630111antisieze.pdf

If you're having trouble getting them to turn, try carb cleaner and compressed air to be sure the threads are clean. You can use a spark plug thread chaser to confirm and to clean the seat if needed. Just don't carve out the existing threads.

rzimmerl
12-10-2013, 12:50 PM
Don't use anything that might interfere with heat transfer and grounding or allow excessive torque. The metal plating on the plug already acts as a lube. See http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/pdf/tb-0630111antisieze.pdf

If you're having trouble getting them to turn, try carb cleaner and compressed air to be sure the threads are clean. You can use a spark plug thread chaser to confirm and to clean the seat if needed. Just don't carve out the existing threads.

If you actually read the bulletin that is for a specific type of coating on the spark plugs that you can use with no anti seize. Typical Autolites have just the black coating that will rust and essentially seize into the head, with antiseize on the threads you won't have to worry about it.

RalphP
12-10-2013, 01:00 PM
Use the copper based anti seize, and it won't insulate the ground run electrically OR thermally.

But I NEVER install spark plugs without the anti-seize now.

RwP

KMT
12-10-2013, 01:02 PM
The last Autolite XP Iridiums I used in my car were nickel plated.

Instructions & tech here:
http://autolite.com/enmx/node/424

And while it may seem like a good idea for aluminum heads, it's still not recommend: http://www.counterman.com/Article/95846/whats_new_in_spark_plugs.aspx

Your choice of course, but I think the practice is a throwback to simpler days :)

David Neibert
12-10-2013, 02:48 PM
Using anti-seize on spark plug threads that are going into an aluminum cylinder may seem like a good idea, but it is NOT recommended. One reason why is that too much anti-seize on the threads can squish past the threads and foul the center electrode, causing the plug to ground out and misfire. Another reason is that anti-seize acts as a lubricant and reduces friction when the plugs are tightened. This increases the risk of overtightening the spark plugs and possibly damaging the plug threads in aluminum cylinder heads. The best advice is to look up the plug torque specifications for the application, and to use a torque wrench to tighten the plugs.



Good luck getting your torque wrench to fit anywhere close to a spark plug.

rzimmerl
12-10-2013, 03:49 PM
The copper Autolites I use are not nickel plated, just the old standard black coating.

KMT
12-10-2013, 03:57 PM
I,ve read here that I should use never seize on the plugs. Should I coat the threads from from top to bottom?

Which plugs do you intend to use?

KMT
12-10-2013, 04:19 PM
The copper Autolites I use are not nickel plated, just the old standard black coating.

Some of the reasons plug manufacturers use a modern black oxide coating is because it is considered a lube while also providing corrosion protection. Other reasons range from low cost to low electrical resistance.

rzimmerl
12-10-2013, 06:51 PM
Yes I know all about coatings on fasteners and such.... so do whatever you want to do....

J dot Miller
12-10-2013, 08:36 PM
I use it on my 5.4L because they are prone to strip plugs. So far I have had no issues.