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Falcon20x
06-29-2014, 02:56 PM
I’m by no means an expert, but I thought I would share my experience, tips and tricks in a successful AC system rebuild.

With the right tools and a little research fixing the system is easy to do, but you need to take your time.

1. Watch all the videos in this thread
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0DXAiQbqWmk (fast forward through the first minute)
61081
2. Before to do anything with the system, properly remove the old R12 refrigerant (check with your local shop).

3. DO NOT SKIP THIS STEP: You need to get the old oil and/or any contamination and debris out of the system. Flush the evaporator, the discharge line, liquid line, and the condenser if you are going to keep them. Set your compressor at 40 PSI for this step
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TeqhOqK1TNA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lnu8hA9F9S4

Warning: No one really tells you about this, but the flushing agent usually evaporates quickly unless it is mixed with oil. The evaporator and the condenser both contain several ounces of oil, both will need a large amount of flush agent to push the oil out (the amount of one flush kit bottle each).
Once you flushed the evaporator and the condenser (40 PSI), you MUST dry out the system. Ideally you should use nitrogen for this, but if you do not have access to a nitrogen bottle then use compress air with the pressure set at 80 PSI. Let the air flow through the components for at least 30 minutes. Doing this will ensure that you have clean and dry component.
If you chose to install a new one, keep in mind that the evaporator is permanently glued into the HVAC housing and will require dash removal to even get close to it.

4. Install the components. (Do not hook them up yet, make sure they all fit)


a. Start with the liquid line. (Remember to add oil all the O-rings)

TIP: On the Thunderbird SC, the orifice tube is build into the liquid line, it must be cut out to be replaced.
A new orifice tube and the necessary kit required for doing the job cost as much as a new liquid line. Unless you live in a extremely hot region and you want the optional automatic adjusting orifice tube (+105 degrees), I recommend that you get a new liquid line with a build in orifice tube.
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Orifice tube Kit $19.88
http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/moreinfo.php?pk=815395&cc=1140387
Orifice tube with automatic adjusting $ 27.79
http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/moreinfo.php?pk=869809&cc=1140387
Liquid line with build in orifice tube $19.99
http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/moreinfo.php?pk=818385&cc=1140387



b. The refrigerant hose assembly/suction line. ( low side, blue side on the pressure gage manifold)

Remember to oil all the O-rings
http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/moreinfo.php?pk=818258&cc=1140387
This is a good time to install the R12 to R 134 conversion kit. Use the small valve screwdriver to remove the valve on the hose.


c. The compressor:

Do not forget to add oil (watch the video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0DXAiQbqWmk).

The manual says the thunderbird SC A/C system requires a oil charge of 7 ounces. The compressor should have between 3 to 5 ounces. In addition, you should add 3 ounces in the evaporator, 1 ounce in the condenser and 1 ounce in the accumulator.
My compressor came prefilled with 6.75 ounces of PAG 46. Make sure you use the same oil in the entire system. I drained 1 ounce from the compressor, added 0.75 ounces and pour it into the drier.

Do not forget to verify the air gap. Mine was set at the factory.

d. Drier/accumulator: (as shown in the video do not forget to add oil to it)

Do not remove the plastic caps until you are ready to install it
http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/moreinfo.php?pk=3908418&cc=1140387
The replacement drier elbows angle is slightly different, but it will fit.


Warning: DO NOT SKIP this one.
When attaching all the components together ensure that all the spring locks are engaged. The drier to evaporator spring lock may appear to be in the lock position, using a mirror to look from the back forward is the only way to ensure that it is properly locked. Do not assume it is otherwise you are taking the risk to have the hose rupture under the pressure. I had to found out the hard way.
6108361080
5. Vacuum out the system (time line 7:10) but first rotate the compressor 10 turns as shown on the video (time line 6:35).
Keep in mind that not all vacuum pumps are equal. If you have the choice, the higher rating/ CFM, the better. Auto zone will loan you a pump with 2 CFM rating
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0DXAiQbqWmk

6. Recharge the system: Do not add more than 90 % of the original R 12 charge.
The Thunderbird SC AC system takes 40 ounces +/_ 2 ounces of R12 Freon.
90% = 36 ounces= 2lb of Freon.
Autozone and O'reilly, both have their own brand of freon 12 O.Z. cans. For a brand new system it is as good as the expensive other brand.
Unfortunately, even with the manifold valve closed, every time you swap a can you will be opening the line letting a little bit of air in it. Once you are sure that your system is leak free (holds the vacuum), you may ask your local shop to vacuum your system again ( 45 minutes) with their pump (better CFM rating) and do this step for you. I did it myself and it still worked out though.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lglPJuBXVeE


Specific Tools needed:

• Vacuum pump (can be rented from Autozone via their free loaner program)
• A/C Flush kit (can be rented from Autozone via their free loaner program) You will also need to get a female air chuck to hook up the bottle to the compressor.
• A/C gauges (can be rented from Autozone via their free loaner program)
• Valve screw driver (You will need this tool to replace the R 12 valve on the low side line with the R 134 adapter.( http://www.banggood.com/Valve-Core-Key-Wrench-Auto-Air-Conditioning-Repair-Tool-Unscrew-Core-p-922354.html?currency=USD&utm_source=google&utm_medium=shopping&utm_content=miko_ruby&utm_campaign=Industrial-us&gclid=CJ3roo2yn78CFQIT7AodpjYALg)
• R134 conversion kit
http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-A-C-System-Valve-Core-and-Cap-Kit-R134a-R12-/141109888079?pt=Motors_Car_Truck_Parts_Accessories&hash=item20dace044f&vxp=mtr
• High capacity air compressor
• AC can tap adapter http://www.amazon.com/R-134a-R-134-Refrigerant-Dispensing-Thread/dp/B00EU1108G



Items requiring replacement:

Drier/ Accumulator:
Orifice tube: http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/moreinfo.php?pk=818385&cc=1140387


Recommend replacement for optimum performance:

• Compressor: The FX 15 compressors are prone to failure, it is only a mater of time before it goes. If you have a original FX 15 compressor you should replace it with a FS 10 compressor.
I recommend buying the kit
http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/moreinfo.php?pk=5242185&cc=1140387
http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/moreinfo.php?pk=3928476&cc=1140387

• Condenser: The cost and time to flush old parts vs the price of a new one was not worth it to me.
http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/moreinfo.php?pk=3612027&cc=1140387

• Liquid line: see comments above.
• Clutch cycling climate control Pressure switch( located on the dryer/ accumulator): The R 12 pressure switch has a higher pressure setting (OFF pressure: 25 PSI/ on pressure: 45 PSI) then R134 (( off pressure 21 PSI/ on pressure 42 PSI).
http://www.oreillyauto.com/site/c/detail/MRY0/36676/01957.oap?year=1990&make=Ford&model=Thunderbird&vi=1140387&ck=Search_01957_1140387_-1&pt=01957&ppt=C0053

TIP
The clutch cycling pressure switch is another thing that most shops won't do or tell you about for the conversion. If you got this far just spend the $25!



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0DXAiQbqWmk

Compressor kit: $ 157.79 ( includes: the o-rings, drier and compressor
Liquid line:$19.99
Condensor: $ 82.79 (you do not have to get a new one)
Refrigerant: $ 36
R12 to R134 conversion kit $7.90
Refrigerant hose assembly( suction line): $89.99 you do not have to get a new one)
Clutch cycling pressure switch: $25.90
Special screw driver: $ 1.90

Total is from -/+ $250 to $424 depending how much you want to do.


After paying $180 at a local shop to convert my A/C system from R12 to R134 the technician told me that my compressor had failed and they will need a additional $400 in labor + parts to finish the job. No need to say what end up doing.

Falcon20x
06-29-2014, 09:25 PM
a few more picures
FS 10 compressor
61085
required chuck to connect the flush bottle to the compressor
61086

spring lock check
61088
61087

I had to do a lot of research to find the little tips that no one really tells you about, I never found one place with a A to B explanation including the little gotchas. This is by no mean the complete story so feel free to make any suggestions or corrections.

S_Mazza
06-30-2014, 12:19 AM
Thanks for the information! I am planning a rebuild later this summer. As soon as possible, really. I already have most of my parts and supplies bought. I will compare my notes to this thread in more detail before I start. Thanks!

XR7 Dave
06-30-2014, 07:54 AM
I thoroughly endorse this thread. On a car 20+ years old it is a minor investment to replace the entire system before suffering a big failure, or replacing it one part at a time, paying to R&R the refrigerate each time. A properly working AC system is a great thing.

The only thing I have to add is to mention that replacing the evaporator is no fun which is another reason why being proactive is the best policy. The evaporator is permanently glued into the HVAC housing and will require dash removal to even get close to it.

Great post!

69Mach1
06-30-2014, 05:30 PM
I agree with all of this also. Having work on a/c systems for the past 35 years, the only thing I would do differently is use nitrogen to blow out the evap or anything else. Compressed air no matter how good the air dryer system is, still has moisture in it. Nitrogen dosen't. I carry some in my truck for that reason, and for a very low pressure purge when doing any brazing on systems to prevent scaling on the inside of system. Very few air dryers can get down to a very low dew points. Low as -15degree f.

Falcon20x
06-30-2014, 06:11 PM
I agree with all of this also. Having work on a/c systems for the past 35 years, the only thing I would do differently is use nitrogen to blow out the evap or anything else. Compressed air no matter how good the air dryer system is, still has moisture in it. Nitrogen dosen't. I carry some in my truck for that reason, and for a very low pressure purge when doing any brazing on systems to prevent scaling on the inside of system. Very few air dryers can get down to a very low dew points. Low as -15degree f.

I did read about that, (I think it is also in one of the videos). It is highly recommended, but unfortunately I did have that option. I will add it to the original post.
Thx

Falcon20x
06-30-2014, 06:13 PM
I thoroughly endorse this thread. On a car 20+ years old it is a minor investment to replace the entire system before suffering a big failure, or replacing it one part at a time, paying to R&R the refrigerate each time. A properly working AC system is a great thing.

The only thing I have to add is to mention that replacing the evaporator is no fun which is another reason why being proactive is the best policy. The evaporator is permanently glued into the HVAC housing and will require dash removal to even get close to it.

Great post!

Thank you for your support!
The reason mentioned above is why the evaporator is the only component I did not change. I will update the post.

KMT
06-30-2014, 06:18 PM
Excellent write up, thanks.

I'd add that doing all this work while the system is open is a great opportunity to change the condenser to a narrow width, parallel flow unit.

TbirdSCFan
07-02-2014, 02:09 PM
Thank you for your support!
The reason mentioned above is why the evaporator is the only component I did not change. I will update the post. I've done this more than once and Im an expert at it.. and I'd say this much "if it aint broke..." ;)

dthompson
07-11-2014, 09:24 PM
Whats the deal with the pressure switch. I am finding conflicting information about using the r134 switch versus the original style r12 switch

KMT
07-11-2014, 09:26 PM
Whats the deal with the pressure switch. I am finding conflicting information about using the r134 switch versus the original style r12 switch


I found the original spec'd switch to be obsoleted with the new one servicing across the board. I was running 134a with the R12 switch and saw no cooling issues, but the compressor cycled more frequently that it should have...a new 134a switch cured that.

RalphP
07-12-2014, 12:38 AM
Technically, if you use the R12-calibrated switch with R134a, the system won't cool as well at max as the proper switch will allow it to, since it will trigger off at a higher pressure (R12's higher than R134a - or is it the other way around?)

PRACTICALLY, I'd wait to swap until you needed to (as in switch quit working).

RwP

dthompson
07-12-2014, 07:27 AM
is there an alternative part number for the switch? I found the version for r12. The r134 switch at oriellys was ridiculous with shipping and there is not an option to ship it to the store. Anyone know of a part number for advanced, autozone, or rockauto?

RalphP
07-12-2014, 08:43 AM
Four Seasons 36676 - RockAuto has them at right under $20 each (http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/raframecatalog.php?carcode=1198672&parttype=4284).

RwP

dthompson
07-12-2014, 09:24 AM
Thanks Ralph, I appreciate it!

KMT
07-12-2014, 09:48 AM
O'Reilly Murray 36676 $21.99
UPC: 96361366763
R134a
System Mounted Cycling Pressure Switch
Off Pressure (psi): 21 psi
On Pressure (psi): 42 psi

Napa 207887 - same specs & similar price.

Falcon20x
07-12-2014, 10:21 AM
Updated the original post with all the inputs I received.
I also added some comments regarding the vacuum pump CFM rating.

TbirdSCFan
07-13-2014, 07:42 PM
is there an alternative part number for the switch? I found the version for r12. The r134 switch at oriellys was ridiculous with shipping and there is not an option to ship it to the store. Anyone know of a part number for advanced, autozone, or rockauto? If you guys have a set of charging guages, you can adjust the r12 switch to cycle lower by peeking inside and turning the set screw (start with about 1/8 turn CCW).. watch low side cycling pressure and if/when you get it to about 20 psi :eek: you should be at minimum core temp. Any lower and you'll probably have freeze up. Charge the high side to about 3x ambient temp (yes.. thats right.. on a 100 degree day.. you'll see over 300psi). I live in Texas and this is how you do it to get 34 out the center vent on a 100 degree day.. ;) Needless to say your condenser needs to be the newer design AND.. your fan must operate properly. :cool:

KMT
07-13-2014, 07:49 PM
If you guys have a set of charging guages, you can adjust the r12 switch to cycle lower...

Yes, that's possible on ones with the screw under the connector & a good tip - just be sure to remove it and check/replace an old o-ring with one that is HNBR compatible. A new 134a switch should come with the right one.

35thauto
07-16-2014, 12:21 AM
Timing is everything , I just did the orifice tube mod. & compressor replacement. I have done the low press switch adjustments before & it's easy.

Falcon20x
07-16-2014, 11:00 PM
Did you use the hot temp area(105 degrees+) orifice tube or just the standard one?

TbirdSCFan
07-17-2014, 12:53 AM
nevrmind :rolleyes:

35thauto
07-17-2014, 01:58 AM
I used the "blue" tube that came with the adapter. I found the blue tube in the crimped liquid line that I cut out.... so I used it. I have seen red , white , blue in other cars but don't know what for. I just posted an example as done that to the thread.

Delaware SC
08-05-2014, 09:26 PM
This thread was great information for rebuilding my air conditioner. Falcon20x has provided a wonderful resource. Better than shop manual etc. The tip from TBirdSCFan to adjust the pressure switch to 20 psi for R134 is awesome. Also appreciated the suggestions for where to add oil and how much. I wish that I had added oil as recommended in this forum when I previously reassembled A/C during motor swap and converting to R134. Might have avoided recent compressor seizing that required this A/C rebuild today.

In addition to ordering compressor, accumulator, and liquid line with orifice tube from Rock Auto I also ordered Motorcraft o-ring set (YF982) but didn't need any of them. The compressor came with two O-rings installed, the accumulator came with O-rings installed and a bag of O-rings, and the liquid line came with O-rings installed and a bag of O-rings.

The flush kit from Autozone worked perfectly. Rather than using a female chuck I removed the valve stem connector from top of tank and replaced with a male plug quick disconnect coupler to connect air hose to. When complete I R&R connector to return it with original valve stem connector. Was funny that gentleman at Autozone said they didn't have an A/C flush kit until I convinced him that their web site said they did have in loan-a-tool. He went in back and came out with a virgin flush kit that had never been used and a quart bottle of flush solvent.

I was confused by multiple oil viscosity to choose from. Nothing in this forum, other forum, or shop manual has specification for viscosity but Autozone had three viscosity (low, medium, & high). Sales dude recommended medium if don't know which to use.

Next to vacuum out, charge with R134, and adjust pressure switch.

KMT
08-05-2014, 09:42 PM
I was confused by multiple oil viscosity to choose from. Nothing in this forum, other forum, or shop manual has specification for viscosity but Autozone had three viscosity (low, medium, & high). Sales dude recommended medium if don't know which to use.
.

I recall using PAG46 for 134a. The compressor came with a note on how many ounces to add. Like ending up with more than enough 0-rings, note if any other oil is added to your 134a and/or to the compressor when shipped.

See https://www.rtitech.com/downloads/News/Oil%20Chart%20-%20Compressor.pdf

...compressor type is Ford FS10.

Falcon20x
08-05-2014, 09:52 PM
The flush kit from Autozone worked perfectly. Rather than using a female chuck I removed the valve stem connector from top of tank and replaced with a male plug quick disconnect coupler to connect air hose to. When complete I R&R connector to return it with original valve stem connector. Was funny that gentleman at Autozone said they didn't have an A/C flush kit until I convinced him that their web site said they did have in loan-a-tool. He went in back and came out with a virgin flush kit that had never been used and a quart bottle of flush solvent.

I was confused by multiple oil viscosity to choose from. Nothing in this forum, other forum, or shop manual has specification for viscosity but Autozone had three viscosity (low, medium, & high). Sales dude recommended medium if don't know which to use.

Next to vacuum out, charge with R134, and adjust pressure switch.

Same thing happened to me:confused:. Autozone had no idea they had one for rent, I even had to explain to them how to use it.

PAG 46 is what my compressor came pre filled with. Everything I read about R 134 and oil points toward PAG 46 as the default oil to use.

Delaware SC
08-05-2014, 10:03 PM
Same thing happened to me:confused:. Autozone had no idea they had one for rent, I even had to explain to them how to use it.

PAG 46 is what my compressor came pre filled with. Everything I read about R 134 and oil points toward PAG 46 as the default oil to use.

Now I understand. PAG 46/100/150 is low/medium/high viscosity

ghostryder
08-06-2014, 07:03 PM
great write up

jacob_coulter
08-13-2014, 07:33 PM
I'm of the opinion it's worthwhile to continue using the R12, even though it's more than R134. The actual price of the gas is pretty menial, a can of R134 is about $12 and a can of old stock R12 goes for around $40 a can, I'd pay that extra premium all day to have better cooling, the difference in price for a full system is a little more than a single tank of gas. And if you have the R12 already in the system, you can recover it. For something you're likely to be using for a decade, it's worth it to me.

All the nonsense that goes along with a conversion just doesn't seem worthwhile with the flushing and incompatible oils, higher pressures, having to install parallel flow condensors, new orifice, etc. To really do it right, many cars require all new AC hoses. You can almost make the case it's cheaper to pay more or the R12 than convert to the cheaper R134.

I had a car converted to R134 from R12 (but not a Thunderbird), and it just never cooled that well. It was done by a pro, and it was in the era when r12 prices had gone through the roof, which is why I did the conversion. I had a 2nd AC pro take a look and he basically said that's as good as its going to get. It was about 70 degrees at the vents, it just kept you from sweating, didn't really cool the car down. I even added auxilary electric fans to help.

I know AC pros get mad at hearing this, but I'd also look into using Hydrocarbon refrigerants as a substitute for R12, brands like Freeze 12, DuraCool, Envirosafe, HotShot, etc. It's basically just Propane with the moisture taken out. I have a good friend that was a Ford Master Mechanic and he was a fan of them as a substitute.

TbirdSCFan
08-14-2014, 11:40 PM
70 degree vent temps... dude... you been scammed LOL!! Thats someone who is just too lazy or doesn't know what he's doing and is passing off BS to get his pay and move on.. :rolleyes::rolleyes:

Sure.. the original refrigerant is the best thing to use, but... since you have to have a license and its hard to procure, using r134a is a reasonable tradeoff. And no.. it doesn't work as well IF you JUST drop it in and do nothing more. You sort of have to "adjust" your old A/C like we discussed. I hit the sweet spot in my red car.. new modern multipass condenser (the OEM tube&fin one will not do the job), new (or adjusted) pressure switch, orange Otube, and charged just right. I get 34 out the vent on recirc. :cool:

Now here's the conumdrum.. IF... and its a big IF... your system is leakfree and in good condition, you would never have lost cooling in the first place.. So its (therefore) broken by definition. You must repair it. For most of the time though, you never have the chance to repair before the compressor goes. When the compressor goes it suffers what is called black death. You essentially have to replace everything under the hood to fix it. This means a new condenser which is only made in the modern 8mm multipass type, compressor, liquid line, and accumulator. Since you have to do all of that anyway even if you stay with R12, making the jump to r134 is not that much more work.

As for HCs.. I might be willing to consider it, but I honestly don't have time to mess with experimenting with it.. so I stick with what has a track record. BTW.. of your list... only Duracool, Envirosafe are actual HC refrigerants.. 2 are r134 blends. Freeze 12 for instance.. the number 12 means well..... it means 12! .. has nothing to do with R12 its purely a labeling gimic. :rolleyes:

S_Mazza
08-15-2014, 02:34 AM
Seems to me that many of us lost our R-12 because the stock O-rings seem to give up if you let the car sit for more than a couple of months. Or the compressor died, which would require a flush and/or parts replacement. So I think most people will be stuck buying new refrigerant in any case.

Still, I do basically agree that the R-12 is not so much harder to get or more expensive that I would automatically jump to R-134a. (I got my Mobile AC certification so I can buy all that stuff now! :D)

jacob_coulter
08-18-2014, 01:04 PM
70 degree vent temps... dude... you been scammed LOL!! Thats someone who is just too lazy or doesn't know what he's doing and is passing off BS to get his pay and move on.. :rolleyes::rolleyes:

Sure.. the original refrigerant is the best thing to use, but... since you have to have a license and its hard to procure, using r134a is a reasonable tradeoff. And no.. it doesn't work as well IF you JUST drop it in and do nothing more. You sort of have to "adjust" your old A/C like we discussed. I hit the sweet spot in my red car.. new modern multipass condenser (the OEM tube&fin one will not do the job), new (or adjusted) pressure switch, orange Otube, and charged just right. I get 34 out the vent on recirc. :cool:

Now here's the conumdrum.. IF... and its a big IF... your system is leakfree and in good condition, you would never have lost cooling in the first place.. So its (therefore) broken by definition. You must repair it. For most of the time though, you never have the chance to repair before the compressor goes. When the compressor goes it suffers what is called black death. You essentially have to replace everything under the hood to fix it. This means a new condenser which is only made in the modern 8mm multipass type, compressor, liquid line, and accumulator. Since you have to do all of that anyway even if you stay with R12, making the jump to r134 is not that much more work.

As for HCs.. I might be willing to consider it, but I honestly don't have time to mess with experimenting with it.. so I stick with what has a track record. BTW.. of your list... only Duracool, Envirosafe are actual HC refrigerants.. 2 are r134 blends. Freeze 12 for instance.. the number 12 means well..... it means 12! .. has nothing to do with R12 its purely a labeling gimic. :rolleyes:

It wasn't a matter of being scammed, they were working with the equipment the car had, you have to make upgrades to get the R-134 to get R12 performance just like the OEMs did when they made the switch, and I'm also dealing with severe 110 degree heat (AZ). In most climates in the US, the conversion would have been fine. This was also the very early days of R-134, parallel flow condensors as an upgrade weren't as universally available to retrofits.

If you're planning on rebuilding nearly everything and making upgrades to the condenser, rerouting lines, etc, then it probably makes sense to go with R-134, but if it's something like your system needs a leak repaired and recharge, I would repair and refill with either R-12 or look at the hydrocarbon route. Even though the old stock R-12 looks expensive, as long as you have a system that doesn't leak, it's not that much more than filling up your tank at the gas station.

R-12 just worked a lot better for car AC, and it was a bullsh#t the reason it got banned the way it did, it was a combination of junk environmental science and new patents. Now they're saying R-134 is bad for the environment just about the time the patents are all expiring and there's a push to ban it. How convenient.

It was very easy to get ice cubes to come out of your vents with an R-12 system. Cars in that era never seemed to have issues cooling, but I've owned new cars from the factory with R-134 and some still have issues. If you live in a really hot climate, I would probably just pay the extra for the R-12 just to get the better performance and reuse as much of the factory setup as possible. Or look into the hydrocarbons. I would only go with R-134 if I had to, but really cold AC is important to me.

CaifanSC
06-07-2016, 06:11 PM
i've been searching for a while and cant find the PN for the 94-95 motorcraft cycle switch. I know I saw it somewhere in the forum but now can't find! Not coming up in Rock auto either.

Do any of you gents have it handy?

Falcon20x
06-07-2016, 10:04 PM
http://m.oreillyauto.com/h5/r/oap/site/c/search/Clutch+Cycle+Switch/01957/C0053.oap?model=Thunderbird&vi=1140578&year=1995&make=Ford
http://m.oreillyauto.com/h5/r/oap/site/c/search/Compressor+Cut-Off+Switch/01961/C0053.oap?model=Thunderbird&vi=1140578&year=1995&make=Ford

CaifanSC
06-07-2016, 10:12 PM
http://m.oreillyauto.com/h5/r/oap/site/c/search/Clutch+Cycle+Switch/01957/C0053.oap?model=Thunderbird&vi=1140578&year=1995&make=Ford
http://m.oreillyauto.com/h5/r/oap/site/c/search/Compressor+Cut-Off+Switch/01961/C0053.oap?model=Thunderbird&vi=1140578&year=1995&make=Ford

You're the man! Looks like motorcraft YH552 it is for me. Thanks!

Falcon20x
06-07-2016, 10:20 PM
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Motorcraft-YH552-AC-Compressor-Clutch-Cycle-Switch-F3AZ-19E561-A-1995-2005-Ford-/222134066718?fits=Model%3AThunderbird&hash=item33b838de1e:g:h-YAAOSw1DtXFqFR&vxp=mtr

Yeah i just saw you were looking speciafically for the rotorcraft one