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superpoop
07-01-2015, 01:55 PM
Hey guys.

An update on superpoop. Its been almost a year since it exploded and we are getting ready to get it back roadworthy.

Anyone got a link or can help me with motor removal that would be great. I feel totally unprepared for it and don't want to create more work when I don't need to.

Neill

Falcon20x
07-01-2015, 07:35 PM
Couple tips to make the removal easier.
Drain the fluids from the engine and coolant system.
Removed the hood. You can lay it on the roof of the car.
Remove both cowlings, the windshield wiper motor tray and the passenger tray. It will make easier to access the two transmission bolts located on top. They are nearly impossible to remove from the bottom.
Remove all the belts.
Remove the air filter and the hose connecting to the TB
Remove the supercharger , TB and the intake tube as one piece. You will need to disconnect the intake coupling, the air cooler and the electrical connectors on the TB. If the car has cooling lines for the TB ( 1990 model) you need to disconnect it before removal. The line is under the TB.
Disconnect and remove the fuel rail. Early model have bolt on the back of driver cylinder head. Cowling being removed helps a lot to remove that bolt.
Remove the Alternator and the steering pump pulley. You will need a pulley puller tool do so.
Consider removing the radiator fan.
Remove the jackshaft/ AC bracket and the alternator bracket (the big black metal pieces). You need do it to gain access to the motor mounts and disconnect the wiring attached to each side of the engine.
Do not forget to disconnect the knock sensor, low oil level sensor.
You also need to disconnect the starter and the four torque converter bolts. Make sure to mark the position of the fly wheel on the torque converter. Ensure that you reinstall it exactly the way it was. Before putting the engine back in, make sure the torque converter is fully seated. While underneath the car place a jack under the transmission so it won't drop down when you pull the engine. It will keep from stretching the hydraulic lines and create future leaks.
Of course disconnect all the exhaust, collant hose, and vacuum stuff. Do not forget to disconnect the o2 sensor on the driver side.
Disconnect the two cooling lines going to/ from the heater core on the fire wall.

I only listed the main items. The will be a few more but mainly electrical connectors.
If you have never done this you can count on 8 hours or so.

636676366863670

dthompson
07-01-2015, 08:24 PM
some dude posted an engine removal on youtube. i watched it a few times just to see someone else doing it. Its not rocket science. tips... get a box of quart ziploc bags, a roll of blue painters tape, a sharpie, and a camera. place fasteners and clips in bags and label them where they go. label each connector on the wiring harness with blue tape. take pictures of each area you before you begin disassembling and especially when it comes to wire routing. take your time... try not to break clips or strip bolts.

Here is a link to that video...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-YSisj1Uf_k

Falcon20x
07-01-2015, 08:53 PM
So funny. That car was local to me and I almost bought it.
The engine never ran right after the swap and the car had been wrecked. Not to mention the paint job.

There is no need to drop the exhaust like he did. Much easier to remove the 2 bolts on each headers. The Ac does not need to be disconnected either.
Not removing the cowling will make it a pain to put the engine back in.

KMT
07-01-2015, 09:08 PM
And...
63672

63673

63674

dthompson
07-01-2015, 09:11 PM
yeah, its not the best video, but sometimes i learn what not to do by watching others. I took everything apart when i did it. i even removed the wiring harnesses. but i did that to clean the engine bay and paint it. i also re-taped my wiring harness with fresh tape.

63675

KMT
07-01-2015, 09:18 PM
I took everything apart when i did it.

And the effort shows - good lesson for anyone when the engine is out...can I ask what you used to trim the airbox?

dthompson
07-01-2015, 09:27 PM
And the effort shows - good lesson for anyone when the engine is out...can I ask what you used to trim the airbox?

lol, you are going to laugh. its copper pipe insulation... something like...

http://www.lowes.com/ProductDisplay?partNumber=24433-1410-P11XB%2f6&langId=-1&storeId=10151&productId=3133245&catalogId=10051&cmRelshp=rel&rel=nofollow&cId=PDIO1

KMT
07-01-2015, 09:52 PM
Actually, that's what I thought it was after I kept looking at it...good news is I think I have some new out in the shed, thanks ;)

superpoop
07-02-2015, 03:31 AM
Holy inspiration batman!

I have seen that thumbnail on YouTube before and I honestly can't remember why I haven't watched it?

Kmt looks like you have done this a few times!

Dthompson thanks for the advice on that, I'm always terrified of losing something important when I take on a larger projects like that. I think this is why I wanted to see how someone else does it.

I will be doing this slowly and taking my time with it all just because it will take me a while to get the other parts in. I'm swapping the headgaskets out while the new motor is out so at least I don't have that to worry about in the future.

Its possibly worth getting a balancer as well? I don't want to disturb the motor too much with it being a running engine but I would like to prepare for any ~~~~ failures in the future.

Neill

aroot1
07-02-2015, 08:32 AM
some dude posted an engine removal on youtube. i watched it a few times just to see someone else doing it. Its not rocket science. tips... get a box of quart ziploc bags, a roll of blue painters tape, a sharpie, and a camera. place fasteners and clips in bags and label them where they go. label each connector on the wiring harness with blue tape. take pictures of each area you before you begin disassembling and especially when it comes to wire routing. take your time... try not to break clips or strip bolts.

Here is a link to that video...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-YSisj1Uf_k



The Ziploc thing is a lifesaver, especially when the job ends up taking longer than expected, and it will, and your memory is shot , like mine :D

I also like to wire wheel all threads, and if trying to pretty things up I rattle can the bolt heads. Wire wheel the whole bolt, degrease, soak in metal etcher for a few minutes, a light dust of self etching primer, then color. I hold them by punching holes in an old cardboard box, then sticking the threads down in a little. Always chip off some paint when putting them back in, but they don't rust as quick as doing nothing. A little redneck, I know, but they look good for quite a while on non winter driven cars.

I also use either loc-tite, or anti-sieze on EVERYTHING. Esspecially going into aluminum

Also if you've got the bux a BHJ balancer is ALWAYS a good upgrade. This goes double if you remove the stocker, they don't seem to like being reinstalled? I understand there is a better replacement stock type balancer ava now, I have not used one yet, but have heard good things, just DO NOT use the Dorman unit.The engineers who decided an aluminum hub on a blown car was a good idea should b beaten half to death with a failed balancer


Adam

KMT
07-02-2015, 10:12 AM
Kmt looks like you have done this a few times



Not mine...just shots I pulled off here over time, that I thought might be a good reference when my time comes.

superpoop
07-02-2015, 12:00 PM
The Ziploc thing is a lifesaver, especially when the job ends up taking longer than expected, and it will, and your memory is shot , like mine :D

I also like to wire wheel all threads, and if trying to pretty things up I rattle can the bolt heads. Wire wheel the whole bolt, degrease, soak in metal etcher for a few minutes, a light dust of self etching primer, then color. I hold them by punching holes in an old cardboard box, then sticking the threads down in a little. Always chip off some paint when putting them back in, but they don't rust as quick as doing nothing. A little redneck, I know, but they look good for quite a while on non winter driven cars.

I also use either loc-tite, or anti-sieze on EVERYTHING. Esspecially going into aluminum

Also if you've got the bux a BHJ balancer is ALWAYS a good upgrade. This goes double if you remove the stocker, they don't seem to like being reinstalled? I understand there is a better replacement stock type balancer ava now, I have not used one yet, but have heard good things, just DO NOT use the Dorman unit.The engineers who decided an aluminum hub on a blown car was a good idea should b beaten half to death with a failed balancer


Adam

I do have an aftermarket balancer on the old motor I was hoping to use. But if they don't like being taken out and reinstalled I figure I would skip this step.

Dorman parts tend to be pretty shoddy quality I have found. Especially their mustang mass air flow sensors. Bought one. CEL and misfire issues. Sent it back and got another, a totally new set of issues relating to stalling out, rough running and cold start no start. Stock replacement? No problem! I'm not a big dorman fan!

I'll be sure to pretty everything up while the motor is out. I have some rust on the cover plates around the shock towers which I would like to address. The car will also be going black at some point providing funds allow.

David Neibert
07-02-2015, 05:08 PM
yeah, its not the best video, but sometimes i learn what not to do by watching others. I took everything apart when i did it. i even removed the wiring harnesses. but i did that to clean the engine bay and paint it. i also re-taped my wiring harness with fresh tape.

63675

Looks great !

David

dthompson
07-02-2015, 06:20 PM
Looks great !

David

Thanks David, it was a lot of work, but as you already know....it's rewarding when you love these cars as much as we do.

superpoop
08-14-2017, 05:05 PM
Reviving my old thread for a reason.

I am almost ready to remove the motor from this old bus after 3 years of it being sat around! Starting to finally see some good progress :D

I need to remove the motor from the trans and im not sure how to. The starter is out, im assuming you go through the starter hole to unbolt the torque converter? I have never removed a trans from an automatic vehicle before, so the whole torque converter thing is new to me.

Neill

Neill.

RalphP
08-14-2017, 07:34 PM
Well, no, you remove the torque converter bolts from the inspection housing; remove the inspection cover and work from there.

The starter DOES have to be out; or at least, it's a lot easier to crank the crank around with the starter out.

RwP

TbirdSCFan
08-15-2017, 02:52 AM
Try to keep it level mostly... or siphon out as much of the fluid into a couple of gallon containers and drain the converter.. there's a small bolt that serves as a drain plug. If you tilt it much, fluid will start pouring out the tailshaft.

superpoop
08-19-2017, 04:53 PM
The motor is now out, and the new one is lined up ready to drop in.

Im having trouble lining the torque converter and flex plate. Its stopping the motor lining up to the mounts. Flex plate is on the motor, torque converter is in the trans.

Any ideas?

KMT
08-19-2017, 05:50 PM
If you try and spin the flywheel, does the tc insist on going w/it? Can you spin the tc at will?

Did you confirm the tc is fully plunged (two steps in?)?

superpoop
08-19-2017, 06:32 PM
If you try and spin the flywheel, does the tc insist on going w/it? Can you spin the tc at will?

Did you confirm the tc is fully plunged (two steps in?)?

the TC appears to be fully seated. I have moved it around and it doesnt appear to want to settle any further into the trans.

My issue is i cant even get the motor to sit on the mounts properly due to the way the flex plate and TC keep meshing together. Seems no matter which angle i try, it doesnt want to sit over the K member and line up with the mounts. Not sure which way is the best way to tackle it. Do i bolt the converter to the flex plate before slotting it into the trans? Do i remove the trans? Do i carry on as i am?

i have given up for the night right now as its pretty late, however i would like to give it another shot either tomorrow or monday evening. :D

neill

potshotscott
08-20-2017, 12:02 AM
Lower the gas tank, pull the drive shaft and move the transmission back a few inches, drop the engine in and then mount the transmission. Once you have the transmission out/down it will be easy to reseat the TC and move the transmission back into place since you won't be dealing with any odd angles.

TbirdSCFan
08-20-2017, 05:56 PM
the TC appears to be fully seated. I have moved it around and it doesnt appear to want to settle any further into the trans.
neill OK. As far as that goes. When it is seated, the TC studs will not be visible from the side. That is to say if you could line up on side of the trans with other, you wouldn't be able to see ANY part of the TC studs... It can be very frustrating and look close.

You can't get it to seat with it in the car.. you have to do that with it sitting out. Then what I do is to position the TC with 1 stud precisely at the bottom, and then spin the crankshaft, with a wrench, until one of the openings is also exactly at the bottom.. then carefuly mate the trans with the engine.

superpoop
08-23-2017, 05:13 PM
When you say i cannot seat with it in the car, do you mean flexplate to TC, Motor to trans, or both?