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89psychobird
06-11-2005, 10:06 AM
After reading every thread about A/C, I still have a few questions.

I plan on replacing the compressor, accum/drier, o-rings, condensor, and liquid line. Can I use a liquid line for a 90 up (with orange orifice tube) because I am replacing everything? It seems the only way to get the correct blue orifice tube for an 89 is to cut the liquid line and use a repair kit; but I want a whole new liquid line.

Which condensor is recommended? Do I have to pull the radiator? The Ford shop manual says nothing about pulling the radiator.

Cobra85
06-11-2005, 11:04 AM
With converting the system over to 134, using the orifice repair kit is going to save you a few bucks. It is easy to do and gives you the advantage of being able to replace it without having to buy a whole new liquid line. I've used this on several cars without problems, as long as you follow the directions!
I have heard that there are more efficent condensors you can buy aftermarket, but so far I've not used one. And yes, you do have to remove the radiator to gain access to the condensor. Still easy to do even on these cars :D

89psychobird
06-12-2005, 10:13 AM
What about the Ready-Aire condenser from Advance Auto?

Cobra85
06-12-2005, 12:04 PM
Like I said, I haven't used an aftermarket condensor. If it has more surface area or more rows of coils and you can justify the cost, what will it hurt if you install it? It should be more efficent than stock.

TbirdSCFan
06-12-2005, 01:06 PM
What about the Ready-Aire condenser from Advance Auto?Take a look at it. It will likely have much smaller tubes that the OEM condenser and more of them. They also split into sets of 4 channels which phase across the width of the condenser.. (What the heck did he say. :confused: :confused: ).. what this really means is the newer style condenser is better than the older for any application. ( R12 or R134a ). It spreads and sheds the heat load uniformly across the condenser surface. The older condenser would be hotter at the top and cooler at the bottom. If you go with r134a, you really should get the newer condenser if you want the coldest air. This is just another one of the cost factors BTW which may mean that R12 might be a better choice. ;) Thats because if you stick with R12, your system needs to be tight... no leaks.. and use the best oring lube you can get (hint: nylog).. thats where the leaks start. :(

I have the GoDan condenser P/N 635545 and Murray liquid line # 55610. This combination with 32oz of r134 was enough to freeze the evaporator.

Here's a small pic of what the newer style condenser looks like. Mine is similar, but this is a different brand. :)

TbirdSCFan
06-12-2005, 02:16 PM
Hang loose on the liq line 55610. Until I can determine just exactly which Otube is in it, I can't recommend it, even though its whats in my application, it appear too restrictive. The line probably matches what came with the R12 refrigerant. I'd like to know what that is.. frankly, what I'm thinking is the original is too restrictive for r134; I'm seeing high pressure readings which look too high. :(

89psychobird
06-12-2005, 11:39 PM
So why did Ford change the orifice tube in 90? What else was different? Nothing that I can find was any different in 90.

Shockwave
06-13-2005, 03:14 AM
If the aftermarket liquid line is bare aluminum it's most likely a orange orifice tube. I had too high of pressures with the orange orifice with my stock 89 condensor. Get a orifice repair kit for the liquid line, that way you can run a Blue tube or maybe one of those varible orifice tubes. I better condensor may help lower the high side pressures though.

My experience with 134a and aftermarket liquid lines is that you have to run less 134a to keep high side pressures down. This causes the low side to be low and you have cycling of the compressor at highway speeds. Even adjusting the low pressure switch down a few psi didn't help. So I bought a fixed orifice repair kit and swapped in a larger blue orifice tube. Advance Auto calls for a blue orifice tube for my 89 in the first place. I didn't think there was any difference between the parts on a 89 and 90. There were about 4 different condensors used on T-Birds over the years though.


Jerry

kpatton
06-13-2005, 09:58 PM
I have a question related to this.. 89 used r12, somewhere later ford changed to 134a. Are the condensors different in these to sc's? If so, if one owned an r12 model they may be able to purchase a condensor for a later model that would possibly be an exact fit? Aftermarkets sometimes have "modifications required" to make fit.. My 89 AC is about shot, pressures look good, cools lousy, and am looking at a conversion later as well.

TbirdSCFan
06-13-2005, 11:10 PM
I have a question related to this.. 89 used r12, somewhere later ford changed to 134a. Are the condensors different in these to sc's?Yes. Until r134a, condenser design lagged; no real need to fix what wudn't broke.

If so, if one owned an r12 model they may be able to purchase a condensor for a later model that would possibly be an exact fit? Aftermarkets sometimes have "modifications required" to make fit.The aftermarket newer condenser is an exact fit.

My 89 AC is about shot, pressures look good, cools lousy, and am looking at a conversion later as well.Not necessarily. If pressures are OK (did you use a set of guages?) and its R12, then you have blockage (leaves, dirt, chewing gum wrappers) in the evap core, or the diverters are not forcing the air past the evap.

Shockwave
06-14-2005, 12:49 AM
Mke sure the blend door is closed so you don't get heat from the heater core. Pressures relate directly to temps so it must be something else.


Jerry

kpatton
06-14-2005, 12:04 PM
Yes, I used guages and thermometers.. The temps and pressures match to the service manual as normal..
I was puzzled and had it into a dealership for something else and had them check.
They confirmed all ok..

Blend door seems to function properly, I'll have to go looking to see if anything is in the evap area... ( what fun, I hope this wan't the first thing installed on the car on the assembly line like most heater cores are... )...

Yet on a hot Dallas summer day, the back seat area never really cools down... My daughter riding in the back sweats to no end.. Compared to my 73 chev pu, you can freeze ice cream on the blowers and have to cut it down or you are chilled..

TbirdSCFan
06-14-2005, 04:14 PM
Yes, I used guages and thermometers.. The temps and pressures match to the service manual as normal..
I was puzzled and had it into a dealership for something else and had them check.
They confirmed all ok..

Blend door seems to function properly, I'll have to go looking to see if anything is in the evap area... ( what fun, I hope this wan't the first thing installed on the car on the assembly line like most heater cores are... )...

Yet on a hot Dallas summer day, the back seat area never really cools down... My daughter riding in the back sweats to no end.. Compared to my 73 chev pu, you can freeze ice cream on the blowers and have to cut it down or you are chilled..Stick a thermomoter in the middle vent with the fan on 2 and A/C on Norm and see what happens, then check it on recirc (Max)... If you're getting 40's or better, then you probably just need to point the vents up and more to the center and turn it up to 3.

Even with my orange Otube/r134 setup (I'm not that satisified with it), I can get 45 on recirc and my back seat passengers are just fine.

If you take the glove box door off and the underdash trim, you can pull the blower motor by removing 3 small bolts. Then take a flashlight and take a peek inside. Its a good idea to clean them out every few years to keep the efficiency up.

BTW, since you're in Dallas, you should visit the Gulf States Forum. ;) ;)