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View Full Version : What Compound are ou using on your DIS Module



rickbtbird
08-13-2005, 04:39 AM
What Compound are you using on the bottom of your DIS Module?

If you read the Chilton Manual it says to use silicone dielectric grease
If you read around here some say to use heat sink compound and others say to use the dielectric.

rickbtbird
08-13-2005, 04:15 PM
just 4 people..hmmm..

J57ltr
08-13-2005, 04:23 PM
Are you sure it doesn't say silicone grease? If it says silicone dielectric grease it's WRONG!

Jeff

90XR7Cougar5spd
08-14-2005, 08:29 PM
What ever came in the box when i bought my new one, all i know it was white. Although the though of super glue does sound good....... :cool:

Derek

rickbtbird
08-15-2005, 09:04 PM
Are you sure it doesn't say silicone grease? If it says silicone dielectric grease it's WRONG!

Jeff
Well there must be a major discrepancy somewhere but both of my Chilton manuals say the same thing.

Book 26760 says on page 2-16 and in figure 41 "Note: Apply a uniform coating of SILICONE DIELECTRIC COMPOUND to the bottom surface of ignition control module assembly". It even shows the blower in the picture.
Book 7919 says on page 15-5 under Ignition Module Step 4, "Apply and even coating of silicone dielectric compound to the mounting surface of the module'.

Does anybody have a FORD service manual to see what it says there? The Hayne’s book doesn't specify any compound.

J57ltr
08-15-2005, 09:43 PM
Interesting I have a 26760 Manual.

Mine shows a pic on page 2-15 Fig. 34

And on the same page under removal and installation it has:

To install:

4. Apply a uniform coat of about 1/32in. (0.08mm) or silicone dielectric compound to the mounting surface of the ignition module.

This is EXACTLY what mine has and what the heck do they mean by "or"? Did they leave out something?

I also had a Haynes manual that listed the firing order wrong on the coil pack.

Just because it is in a book doesn't make it true.

I don't have any numbers for the thermal resistance of spark plug grease, but since heatsinking it's not it's intended purpose I am going to figure that it is not that great.

I don't think anyone here has numbers on how hot the DIS module gets on it's own, that is without any external heating sources. Who knows maybe it doesn't need a heatsink afterall.

Jeff

rickbtbird
08-15-2005, 10:32 PM
Interesting I have a 26760 Manual.

Mine shows a pic on page 2-15 Fig. 34

And on the same page under removal and installation it has:

To install:

4. Apply a uniform coat of about 1/32in. (0.08mm) or silicone dielectric compound to the mounting surface of the ignition module.

This is EXACTLY what mine has and what the heck do they mean by "or"? Did they leave out something?

I also had a Haynes manual that listed the firing order wrong on the coil pack.

Just because it is in a book doesn't make it true.

I don't have any numbers for the thermal resistance of spark plug grease, but since heatsinking it's not it's intended purpose I am going to figure that it is not that great.

I don't think anyone here has numbers on how hot the DIS module gets on it's own, that is without any external heating sources. Who knows maybe it doesn't need a heatsink afterall.

Jeff
That's really wacky.. but the first page of my Chiltion says it was published by Haynes North America. Both book have a drawing of the Distributorless V6 system.

Ignition System Firring Order: 1-4-2-5-3-6
coil pack.. see pic
(1) (2) (3)
(5) (6) (4)

J57ltr
08-15-2005, 10:58 PM
It was only on the Haynes manual and it was only one edition that I know of. I threw mine away after I saw it, besided the regualr haynes manual is worthless as tits on a boar hog. The Taurus manual (Haynes) doesn't even mention ABS, which is the only probelm I have.

There were tons of posts years ago about not being able to get the car running because they were following the order in the book, that's why I brought it up.

Jeff

kpatton
12-13-2006, 02:20 PM
Well there must be a major discrepancy somewhere but both of my Chilton manuals say the same thing.

Book 26760 says on page 2-16 and in figure 41 "Note: Apply a uniform coating of SILICONE DIELECTRIC COMPOUND to the bottom surface of ignition control module assembly". It even shows the blower in the picture.
Book 7919 says on page 15-5 under Ignition Module Step 4, "Apply and even coating of silicone dielectric compound to the mounting surface of the module'.

Does anybody have a FORD service manual to see what it says there? The Hayne’s book doesn't specify any compound.

Ford Manual page 23-04-07
Apply a uniform coating of heatsink grease ESF-M99G123A or equivalent to the mounting surface of the DIS module. Install module and tighten bolts to 2.5-3.5 N-M ( 22-31 lb-in).

-Keith

rickbtbird
12-13-2006, 10:00 PM
Ford Manual page 23-04-07
Apply a uniform coating of heatsink grease ESF-M99G123A or equivalent to the mounting surface of the DIS module. Install module and tighten bolts to 2.5-3.5 N-M ( 22-31 lb-in).

-Keith
Thanks, I came to that conclusion myself about a year ago.

92sclikenew
12-21-2006, 09:19 PM
i used artic silver heat sink compound at my local computer store 8$ for 3.5 grams.

bowez
12-21-2006, 10:13 PM
I used the cheap heat sink compound from RadioShack, and while it is sold as Heatsink compound the container calls it silicone dielectric compound (though the direction portary it as heat sink compound).

kenewagner
04-10-2008, 12:11 PM
There has been a lot of discussion back and forth. The pictures is from my 1993 Ford Thunderbird Service Manual. It saids Dielectric compound. It doesnt say grease so I dont know if there is a diffrence there. I have used Dielectric grease simple because of that. I also have replaced my Dis many times so that may or may not be the reasonRegardless there is evidence that a heat sink compound other than Dielectric might be called for. I always try to have an open mind;) I would like to know what the 3 voters that voted other used.

Ken

drlance
05-15-2008, 05:50 PM
All heat sink compound/grease is dielectric. It is put on for it's ability to conduct heat and grounding of the component.
Most items that only need heat transfer will have a mylar sheet that fits between the component and the attaching bracket if it is not to be grounded there. there will also be little insulated washers and usuallt plastic screw a to mount it with. So This means that the case of the DIS is also a ground. It also gets hotter than the mounting bracket and it needs a way to get rid of the excess heat.
Any heat sink grease will work, the silicone one probably conducts heat a little better.
Lance

Duffy Floyd
05-15-2008, 07:09 PM
Huh????? Dielectric grease is an insulator not electrically conductive. Otherwise when you used it on multi-pin connectors you would short out the connector. Heat sink grease is both electrically and heat conductive. (At least Artic Silver and the Ford stuf)

Mike8675309
05-15-2008, 07:31 PM
picked up white heat sink stuff from Radio shack. Works o.k.

rickbtbird
05-15-2008, 07:33 PM
Dielectric grease is a non-conductive grease. Because it is non-conductive it does not enhance the flow electrical current. Electrical conductors should not be coated with dielectric grease prior to being mated. However, dielectric grease is often applied to electrical connectors, particularly ones which contain rubber gaskets, as a way to provide a non-conductive lubricant and sealer for the rubber portions of the connector.

The widest use of dielectric grease is in high-voltage connections associated with spark plugs. The grease is applied to the rubber boot of the plug wire. This helps the rubber boot slide onto the ceramic insulator of the plug. The grease also acts to seal the rubber boot, while at the same time preventing the rubber from becoming stuck to the ceramic. Generally spark plugs are in located in areas of high temperature, and the grease is formulated to withstand the temperature range expected.

Another common use of dielectric grease is on the rubber mating surfaces or gaskets of multi-pin electrical connectors used in automotive and marine engines. The grease again acts as a lubricant and a sealant on the non-conductive mating surfaces of the connector. It is not recommended to be applied to the actual electrical conductive contacts of the connector.

Dirtyd0g
08-02-2011, 01:14 PM
I have seen a guy put dielectric grease on one after I specifically told him heat sink compound and then the car would not start. I looked into my computer stuff found a pack of heat sink compound and wiped the grease off and redid it. It ran just fine after that.
Alan

TvilleTbird
09-11-2012, 04:21 PM
I use something similar to this...

http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/AdhesivesForElectronics/Home/Products/ThermalSolutions/ThermallyConductiveAcrylicPads/?WT.mc_id=Electronics_Redirect&WT.tsrc=Redirect

It's not made by 3M, and can't for the life of me remember who it's made by, but we use it here @ work for thermal transfer in a vacuum chamber. Completely insulates electrically, but had no problem w/ car starting or running. It even fixed the car stalling in the parking lot here at work and just seems like the idle is stronger too...

KMT
11-02-2013, 04:47 PM
we use it here @ work for thermal transfer in a vacuum chamber.

The pedestal is hotter (which is one reason why the DIS was moved off it in later models) - why would you add anything that aids heat transfer upwards into the DIS...

rickbtbird
11-26-2013, 10:58 PM
The pedestal is hotter (which is one reason why the DIS was moved off it in later models) - why would you add anything that aids heat transfer upwards into the DIS...

I had a 90 and I still have a 95. DIS were a lot more troublesome on the 90 for sure but, if you did the correct setup with the correct compound, the problems were minimal.

KMT
11-26-2013, 11:27 PM
I had a 90 and I still have a 95. DIS were a lot more troublesome on the 90 for sure


I think some of the newer DISs for the early cars help overall.

gmctech
09-20-2015, 02:36 PM
I use anti seize compound. Works great.......