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MikeKanterakis
12-08-2007, 09:29 PM
Hello, I have been running the Evans Coolant in my daily drivers for the past 2 years and noticed a build-up of black sludge in the overflow tank. It's thicker than the regular evans.

I've cleaned it up and will check it again if a few months.

The car is still cooling at optimum (normal) efficiency.

Mike8675309
12-08-2007, 10:46 PM
I'd call Evans and ask them about it. Was your motor completely clean before adding the evans, or did you do a conversion with a flush to get out the old coolant?

I assume you are running the NPG+?

MikeKanterakis
12-09-2007, 11:16 PM
Yup, super clean. I built it myself :-) I was going to give Evans a call and run it by them. I guess I should have saved some of the sludge though...

Yeah, it's NPG+.

pablon2
03-23-2009, 08:37 PM
Yup, super clean. I built it myself :-) I was going to give Evans a call and run it by them. I guess I should have saved some of the sludge though...

Yeah, it's NPG+.

Did you find anything out from Evans?

MikeKanterakis
03-24-2009, 12:14 AM
unfortunately, no. I let all that sludge wash out and didn't save any.

I'll probably check again soon and see if there's any more sludge in there. If so, I'll send some into Evans and ask their input. Otherwise, this stuff is the bomb! and I totaly recomend it.

XxSlowpokexX
03-24-2009, 12:37 AM
My experience is that the Evans darkens with age and when I asked about it that was normal. Contaminants.

Are you running it low pressure or 0 pressure?

KMT
03-24-2009, 12:55 AM
>noticed a build-up of black sludge in the overflow tank

Still running a pressurized system, I take it...

-=-=-=-

From EvansCooling.com...

"EVANS 'NPG +' WATERLESS ENGINE COOLANT. (http://www.evanscooling.com/html/npgben1.htm)

Secondary Benefits of NPG Coolant For Gasoline Engines:

Non-pressurized: (or low pressure, i.e. 4.0 psig) decreased leaks, lower pressure parts, decrease of thermal flexing or cycling (component life extended), elimination of accidents resulting from accidental removal of radiator caps from hot engines.

Allows for a totally closed system (Hermetically Sealed) requiring no service checks and is not subject to contamination. (...etc...)"

Mike8675309
03-24-2009, 11:45 AM
I drained my NPG-R after a year of running it when I installed a new cooling fan on my car. As expected, it had changed color to a brownish color. Nothing to worry about, as again, they say that is what will happen.

I didn't have any "sludge" though there were particles in the drained coolant, likely mostly due to scale and build up in the heater tubes and heater core collecting (since the block, water pump, and radiator were all freshly cleaned).

I strained the coolant through cheese cloth before pouring back into the radiator when I buttoned it all up. I still run the stock pressure cap. I had two issues with aftermarket cooling fan and controller that could have lead to a significant problem if I was just running Antifreeze and Water. The extra safety of the higher boiling point of the NPG-R, and the elimination of corrosion and no freezing is what has me using the product in my seasonal vehicles.

pablon2
03-24-2009, 12:05 PM
I drained my NPG+ after a year of running it when I installed a new cooling fan on my car. As expected, it had changed color to a brownish color. Nothing to worry about, as again, they say that is what will happen.

I didn't have any "sludge" though there were particles in the drained coolant, likely mostly due to scale and build up in the heater tubes and heater core collecting (since the block, water pump, and radiator were all freshly cleaned).

I strained the coolant through cheese cloth before pouring back into the radiator when I buttoned it all up. I still run the stock pressure cap. I had two issues with aftermarket cooling fan and controller that could have lead to a significant problem if I was just running Antifreeze and Water. The extra safety of the higher boiling point of the NPG+, and the elimination of corrosion and no freezing is what has me using the product in my seasonal vehicles.


Since I'll be running a stock-sized radiator and making sizeable power, I figured I'd try the Evans NPG+. I can get 4 gals for $110. Although I don't have an AC condensor to contend with, I do have a large FMIC partially blocking the radiator. Hey Mike, due to the cold ambient temps, do refrain from starting your SC when in storage when using Evans?

Mike8675309
03-24-2009, 12:38 PM
Since I'll be running a stock-sized radiator and making sizeable power, I figured I'd try the Evans NPG+. I can get 4 gals for $110. Although I don't have an AC condensor to contend with, I do have a large FMIC partially blocking the radiator. Hey Mike, due to the cold ambient temps, do refrain from starting your SC when in storage when using Evans?

To clarify... I run NPG-R, not the NPG+. Sorry if I confused them as I just think NPG, and forget the - and + stuff. NPG-R has higher boiling point than NPG+, and because of that it will get more viscous at a higher temp than the NPG+.

Thus I won't "regularly" run the car when the daily average temp drops below 30. This because the NPG-R thickens and shrinks as it cools, eventually getting to a point where, while flowable, I'd have to add more fluid to keep it from cavitating. I will start the car 2 or 3 times from November to March to keep things in shape and take care of the battery. I try to do this during the warmest part of the day. That said, I did drive the car to the storage place, two years ago, when the outside temp was 28 degrees and didn't have any issue other than it took a little longer to come up to temp.

Please keep in mind that a Water/Antifreeze mix is better able to transfer heat than Evans NPG+ is. In fact, straight water is the best. What that means is that your operating temperature will be higher with Evans vs if you were running straight water. Evans won't drop your coolant temp, but what it will do is ensure you don't "boil over" at the coolant temp you are at.

pablon2
03-24-2009, 02:26 PM
Evans recommends actually removing one's thermostat. Has anyone running Evans experimented with this?

MikeKanterakis
03-24-2009, 04:54 PM
My experience is that the Evans darkens with age and when I asked about it that was normal. Contaminants.

Are you running it low pressure or 0 pressure?

Yeah, it's at Zero pressure. I gutted the radiator cap. I guess it's contaminants, but only what can get in from that tiny hold at the top of the overflow tank.

pablon2
03-24-2009, 05:36 PM
My experience is that the Evans darkens with age and when I asked about it that was normal. Contaminants.



I read that the color change is normal and is due to the heat from the engine.

ricardoa1
03-24-2009, 05:42 PM
Id like to hear more about this. What are the bennefits and if its worth the extra expense. No Tstat and no Pressure cap :confused:

Mike8675309
03-24-2009, 06:59 PM
Id like to hear more about this. What are the bennefits and if its worth the extra expense. No Tstat and no Pressure cap :confused:

The purpose of the pressure cap on cooling system is to help increase the boiling point of water to prevent boiling. When the water/coolant mixture is able to boil, anywhere that air is, transfer of heat is not occurring. This creates localized temperature spikes and pressure spikes which can damage the internal components of your engine.

Evans NPG, NPG+ and NPG-R are a formulation of coolant that requires no WATER component. They have very high boiling points, so high that if your cooling system is working properly, it would be extremely unlikely for the boiling point to be achieved within your cooling system operated at ambient air pressure.

Downsides to the product:
#1 - Availability. You won't find this at your local auto parts store, or gas station should you have a failure.
#2 - It can not have any water added to it. If there is more than 2% water in the NPG, you effectively kill any increased boiling point, thus you will need to treat it like regular anti-freeze. (thus switching to it requires very special procedures to purge all water from your system)

Upsides:
#1 - high boiling point
#2 - lifetime coolant (never need to replace... except for the NPG-R version)
#3 - Reduced pressure in your cooling system, possibly increasing life of hoses.

Note the recommendation to remove the thermostat mostly applies to the NPG, not NPG+. The viscosity of NPG is quite high, and to use it typically you need a special, slower turning water pump, and you remove the thermostat as it restricts flow too much at partial openings. NPG+ was developed to increase the viscosity of the coolant so that it could be used without a special water pump. Personally I run a thermostat with the NPG-R as I daily drive the car in the summer and prefer to let the engine manage it's temperature.

ricardoa1
03-24-2009, 07:14 PM
So the engine will run hotter? As that benneficial? Most people dont even like getting the temps over 200f.

The extra heat will radiate to IC tubes and manifold no?

Sounds interesting. I had problems with coolant temps last year after hot lapping the car at the track will this help or make things worse?

MikeKanterakis
02-09-2010, 09:04 PM
well, I'm not sure what, if anything is wrong with the coolant. I did tell Dave at Evans about the sludge, so he took my coolant for testing. I also told him that it's been in the car after a complete rebuild. However, it's been in the cold winter's of New Jersey, and the intense heat of Las Vegas. So, it's definately been put through the ringer.

I all started w/the car running a bit hotter and overflowing the overflow-tank. I narrowed it down to the sludge blocking the re-uptake of coolant and the extreme coolant heat melting the nipple at the bottom of the overflow-tank.

Speaking of melting, I noticed that the low-radiator sensor for the VMM located at the top of the overflow-tank was melting out some black sludge that was originally sealing the circuitry of the sensor itself. So, maybe THAT's our mysterious black sludge.

Next, my thermostat broke in the closed position. I gutted that and have been running w/out one for a while now. it seems fine, but the car is ultimately running hot still, so the problems continue.

Next, I drained the old coolant for testing by Evans, replaced the overflow tank, flushed the system, and ultimately replaced it w/new Evans. ;-) (thanks Dave)

I have yet to overflow the overflow-tank again. So that tells me that the sludge should be gone, or that the melted nipple was a factor inhibiting uptake of expanded coolant. Regardless, the engine bay is a bit cleaner.

I also recently replaced the heater-core and now that's 100% blocked at times, so the vent blows cold air with the heater on. OH BOY!! so, there's still some CRAP in my coolant system. I've guessed it's from the radiator as it's probably seen it's better days. I ordered a Tefba filter for the coolant system as well as a new radiatorexpress.com all alluminum unit w/$20 discount. (Thanks SCCOA)

The blocked heater-core, I think, also causes the fan to not come on as regularly b/c the sensor is on the line leaving the heater core. Now, it is plugged in almost directly to the lower intake, so it's close to the coolant temperature at the top of the block. However, I spent 10:00pm to 11:30pm last night bypassing the heatercore with a copper elbow piece that I made when the original heatercore was leaking Evans on my shoe (nice!)

The radiator fan seems to cycle fine, and I used a infrared thermometer to test the coolant temp. it cycles from 185/190 to about 220-ish just before the fan turns on. However, the gauge on the dash says I've pegged the temp every 15 minutes or so (depending on driving conditions) and throws the "check gauge" light.

I think the gauge is broken/dying.

but, then again, with 315,000 miles, every day I keep this thing on the road is a small miracle. However, I'll have you know I raced a Factory-5 Cobra and smoked 'em with stock sized tires; not to mention the 94 mile commute in one direction from Oceanside to Los Angeles.

Long Live the SC. besides, I've still got the blue 5-speed! :cool:

I'll keep you posted as the story unfolds.

Mike8675309
02-09-2010, 10:39 PM
hmm, it'll be interesting to hear back. I've had the NPG+R in my 93 for 3 seasons, and during last season I drained and re-filled it at least twice due to issues with a thermostat. Never noticed anything other that fluid in the fluid so far. I always filter it with cheese cloth before putting it back into the engine.

MikeKanterakis
02-09-2010, 10:51 PM
I've literally only topped off the system if I've noticed it low. Maybe a yearly filtering is all it needs. It'll be interesting to see what the Tefba filter picks up.

XxSlowpokexX
08-16-2010, 09:08 PM
To the top. Ive finally decieded to run the EVans NPG+ in my Teal car this time around.

A few things that have and havent been mentioned.

There is no need for a higher flowing pump with the NPG+
Your engine may very well run HOTTER. This is due to the non aquious nature of the coolant not being as efficient in heat transfer....But the posatives are



Better combustion (due to temp)

Less fan cycle time. (due to temp as well) Its alledgedly easier to maintain a higher temp

0 to low pressure. GREAT!

steaming boiling....All eliminated in system

So Ill see how this goes

Also going to run factory fan settings and 195 high flow tstat.

Will modify tune so that ECT doesnt pull timing
Cars comming together so Ill report on it within the next couple of weeks

Mike8675309
08-16-2010, 09:46 PM
0 to low pressure. GREAT!


You'll only see that if you change your pressure cap to something lower than stock.

Did anything come of the testing mike?

XxSlowpokexX
08-17-2010, 12:21 PM
I started running the Evans NPG in my Red SC back in 2001. I bought the Griffith double 1 1/2 custom core rad to go along with it. I also ran it at 0 pressure. The car always heated up faster and when romping onit (21 psi) and ran always on the warmer side. This was back when I was trying everything to ward off knock and detonation however I had noway to play with any computer settings such as fan turn on ECT timing reduction.

I figured now that I have everything in my engine and system drained Id give Evans a shot again. But this time Ill be able to set fan temps to a point were they may not cycle as much. There is a point (unsure what that temp is)where the surrounding air will extract heat from the radiator faster due to the higher operating temperature and will also work with the NPG+ coolant which needs a higher Delta T to operate well (water of course needs less)

I should then be able to go into the tune and bump up the factory ECT safety settings to a higher degree before pulling timing.

Much of our factory tuning and safety settings are totally set and dependant on the boiling point of water. Sure water is the best at what it does...Up untill that point where it begins to change phases. The Evans allthough not as efficient at lower temperatures works (which is key) under a wider temperature range, way beyond that of water.

I am trying to basically avoid knock and detonation due to waters inability to do its job at the higher temperature ranges our cars run at with AC and big front mount intercoolers.

The biggest hurdle I see is the factory oil cooling system which I need to look into replacing with an air cooled setup. I dont want the oil staying hot...I been told it should be ok but Id perfer to keep it on the cooler side of thngs.

So Mike. WHen I was running the NPG I had to mod a few things because of the viscosity but I have been told I wouldnt have most of those issues with the newer NPG+. I had no issues with the 0 presure system. I wan tto go that rout ethis time as well unless you guys cna convince me it's a bad idea. I like not having to worry about exploding hoses especially as our cars get older.

Also being I havent done this conversion in awhile nor dealt witht he NPG+..Any reccomendations are welcome. I picked up a high flow 195 t stat to replace my 180 and will be running higher fan settings...Or at least I plan on...So ant comments on th at would be appreciated

ricardoa1
08-17-2010, 12:32 PM
I think you will sacrifice performance when running higher temps. But should give you better mileage and be more consistent.

XxSlowpokexX
08-17-2010, 01:34 PM
Rico I shouldnt be sacrificing performance, if anything gaining it from the consistancy of Evans coolant at higher temps.

The biggest misconception is that a lower runnng temp means better performance. This is due to the performance of water as a coolant. Our pressurized radiator is merely a pressure cooker waiting to explode. I realize is hard to see a hotter running engine as in the performance world. Having stability and control of the coolant up to 300 degres plus is a good thing. WORST case scenario is I dump it and lose $150 bucks. But I cant see that being an issue. Evans even says with the NPG+ you can just do the conversion and go...All other things being equal. no cap swap or fan temp setting changes. Knowing that temperatures perfer to be in equillibrium Im trying the higher side of our runningtemps knowing that the coolant temp can more than likely stay more consistant at that range being the Evans will work better that way.

Also as far as fan cycling. Im still looking at a DCC controller that will gradually ramp up fan speeds but figure I can spend that 150 plus at a later date.

Well see what happens. Im sure Ill have a string of tuning related questions in regards to changng settings. Seems I never quite get that right

Mike8675309
08-17-2010, 01:48 PM
I think you will sacrifice performance when running higher temps. But should give you better mileage and be more consistent.

higher temps in and of themselves do not lead to lower performance.

I don't think the change in pressure is too much of an issue since at 0psi it doesn't boil until 375f. I still run a stock radiator pressure cap, mostly because I'm still shaking things out and try not to change too many variables. I also run NPG-R which is hits it's peak at 7psi of system pressure.

I bumped up timing timing retard numbers for coolant and air charge temps. Coolant due to the improved boiling resistance, and air charge due to my meth nozzle being after the ACT sensor.

With the A/C off, my single 16" spal fan has no trouble maintaining my set points for cooling. (I have a griffen large tube radiator). I have a 180 thermostat, the fan is set to come on at 50% power at 190 and full power at 200. Highway driving, temps stay right around 185 to 195 depending on outside air. City driving temps stay right around 195 to 205 depending on what I just did with my right foot and how many lights I got stuck at back to back. With the A/C on... well I need to add a pusher fan. Cruising down the highway with the a/c on temps stay at 195 to 205. But in town, temps can get up to 220, indicative of just not enough air flow over the radiator. (I am using the spal fan controller though will swap to a dcc control system soon.)

I try to keep the temp below 200 not because I have to, but because you have to pick a number you want to maintain control at and that's the one I picked. Factory setups run around 210-220. I figure 200 is a reasonable trade off.

I know for sure the Evans saved me a damaged head gasket, if not warped head when I had a thermostat stuck and had engine coolant temps over 250f degree. Regular antifreeze would have been boiling and spiking engine temps way over the coolant temp. With evans, there was nearly another 200 degrees f before a bubble would have appeared.

David Neibert
08-17-2010, 02:53 PM
I just can't get right with the higher operating temps. My wife's Charger runs at 210 in any weather and it drives me crazy. My 93 runs similar temps in the summer and even though it doesn't seem to be hurting performance or either car, it still bugs me.

I've been conditioned to believe that a cooler running motor makes more power, because it can run more ignition timing advance without detonation. I've also been told the only reason for operating at higher temps (when you don't have too) is to make the emissions systems more efficent or to increase gas mileage.

David

ricardoa1
08-17-2010, 03:04 PM
I just can't get right with the higher operating temps. My wife's Charger runs at 210 in any weather and it drives me crazy. My 93 runs similar temps in the summer and even though it doesn't seem to be hurting performance or either car, it still bugs me.

I've been conditioned to believe that a cooler running motor makes more power, because it can run more ignition timing advance without detonation. I've also been told the only reason for operating at higher temps (when you don't have too) is to make the emissions systems more efficent or to increase gas mileage.

David


This has been my belief also. More timing, less detonation, more power. I Could be wrong. My car runs like a rape ape when the car is has only been running 10 minutes or so. When the heat starts to sink in it feels very sluggish.

XxSlowpokexX
08-17-2010, 03:34 PM
The reasoning behind lower temps being better is due to the restrictions of the ability for your water based coolant to properly function within those temps. Once you get into the 210 plus range your water based coolant is on the edge of doing funky stuff. The funky stuff causes cavitation, hot spots and a slew of other things which cause detonation and knock.

Our engines factory tune is also based on this thus why the ECT alarm settings to remove timing are there. These can be adjusted with use of the Evans.

I wouldnt ever try this or spend the money is the theory behind it wasnt there. Believe me.

If you do research you will find some that understand..And others that just dont get it. One guy I was reading up on used EVans and his car ws running hotter yet he experienced no boil over and his knock was eliminated according to his datalogs. Not liking the fact the car was running hotter (was like 230) he removed the evans and replaced it with distilled watter and water wetter.

Found out the reason he went to Evans in the first place was because he was running hot and boiling over.....His normal temps were around 210 or so but when he romped on it for periods of time hed spike at around 230 and thus overheat and boil over. So the boilig over came back as did knock when switching back to a water based system. He ended up changing his radiator which was the problem in the first place. Was a high powered turbo application. NEever said if he swapped back to Evans however

The point being our cars cooling is dictated and designed around the characteristics of its coolant. If our engines needed to be run at 170 due to mechanical reasons lets say...Wed need a huge cooling system capable of doing so and the EVans wouldnt ever be an option as the sytem would need to be extra huge(Due to Evans coolants inefficiency in that capacity)....but our operating temps are based on the range in which water based coolant can be used to cool not for mechanical reasons...

If you run a good synthetic oil the extra temps shouldnt be a problem in that regard either.


How nice would it be to see your temps climb afte rbeeting teh heck out of your car and NOT havde to worry about overheating of blowing a hose, boiling over etc...

XxSlowpokexX
08-17-2010, 03:35 PM
This has been my belief also. More timing, less detonation, more power. I Could be wrong. My car runs like a rape ape when the car is has only been running 10 minutes or so. When the heat starts to sink in it feels very sluggish.

Rico....Car ges hot.....Timing gets pulled. I am looking more towards consistancy then power...I want my car to be just as quick now...10 min or 20 min from now

Mike8675309
08-17-2010, 06:23 PM
Some research:
http://www.cigrjournal.org/index.php/Ejounral/article/view/1122

The influence of the cylinder block and cylinder head temperatures on brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) and on exhaust emissions were measured. The results show that raising the temperature of the coolant in the engine block can produce significant improvements in bsfc with a corresponding reduction in the hydrocarbon (HC) emissions. Similarly, lowering the coolant temperature in the cylinder head increases the knock limit of the engine with a corresponding reduction in the levels of NOx in the exhaust emissions. The objective of this investigation was to access the magnitude of the likely benefits of the dual circuit cooling system.

These results point to one of the reasons for the GM change to a reverse cooling flow pattern in the LS motors (and the battle with Evans) where the heads get the cooler water and the block gets the hotter water.

That being said, the detail behind the study (website seems to come and go) shows that the difference in a single cylinder 4 cycle motor was under 10%.

In addition, fuel decisions and efforts to cool the intake air temp can offset much of the issues related to NOx and knock limits since we are working to drop combustion temps. And by having more (rather than less) heat in the heads, less combustion energy goes to heating the heads, and more can be used to push the pistons.

As far as the difference between a cold motor and a hot motor and how it feels. That is likely directly related to the tune of the motor and the slight increase in air density that is otherwise lost once the intake manifold is fully heated up.

You don't want to run a street car below 180 and ideally it's more around 190 as you want the oil hot enough to boil off any water collecting from condensation. Race cars they set the coolant based on the ideal viscosity for the oil used in the cars as coolant temp goes directly to engine oil temp. I believe NASCAR runs their motors around 220. Drag cars tend to be around 100. NASCAR uses 5w-20 oil, and NHRA runs 0w-5 weight oil.
http://www.joegibbsracingoil.com/trainingcenter/tech/friction.html

Not only do todays motors run hotter, but they are designed to do so. Thus clearances are optimized for their operating temperature. Lowering the temperature significantly could lead to excess internal wear.

XR7 Dave
08-17-2010, 09:49 PM
You guys are focused on coolant temperature and not engine temperature. It is not beneficial to run higher engine temperatures but it is possible to run higher coolant temperatures while running cooler engine temperatures.

Engine oil temperatures are not dictated by coolant temperatures and therefore are more or less not dependent on coolant temperature. Engine oil temperatures are more a function of combustion heat and friction.

Observed coolant temperature is only an average sampled at the thermostat housing and it says very little about the temperatures seen inside the heads. It is not uncommon for hot spots to occur within the cylinder heads that exceed 300 deg with average coolant temperatures being 200 deg. Because water based coolants will vaporize long before 300 deg, they lose their ability to transfer heat which results in the hot spots getting even hotter.

Since Evans does not boil, it will not form hot spots in the cylinder heads and will therefore result in a reduction of hot spots that would normally occur at 200-240 deg in a water based cooling system. It is these hot spots that contribute to detonation, not the average cooling system temperature.

The power reduction that anyone here is feeling on a hot motor has little or nothing to do with coolant temperatures but instead is a reflection of air charge temperatures. The fact that the motor is hot is coincidental with the heat soak that has occurred within the IC and related systems. If you could keep your air charge cool, power would hold nearly steady under all conditions.

Mike8675309
08-17-2010, 11:38 PM
Engine oil gains its heat through friction and combustion. Engine oil releases its heat through conduction into the block and oil pan and is carried away by coolant and airflow. As such, coolant temperatures will impact engine oil temperatures.

To clarify, Evans Coolants all boil. They simply have such a high boiling point they should never experience boiling in a properly functioning automotive cooling system.

Engine coolant temp is a value that goes directly to timing advance/retard as well as Air Fuel Ratio in the two strategies for the EEC-IV I have. As such, it can have a direct impact on performance.

Super XR7
08-18-2010, 05:58 AM
I've been running the NPG-R in my car along with a 7 lb cap and a 160 deg thermostat for two years with out any issues. My car runs at 170-180 degrees. I change over to this coolant to reduce the possiblity of hot spots in the cylinder head; thus reducing the chance for detonation.

Mike

XxSlowpokexX
08-18-2010, 09:44 AM
Mike et al.

Being that many of the EEC parameters for coolant temp measurment lead to richening or decreasing the timing I would like to knwo how to raise those limits temperature wise as they directly affect performance for the sake of safety. Safety due to the nature of a water based coolant. Reducing timing to reduce detonation (which may not be an issue due to no longer using a water based coolant) and richening the mixture to cool down combustion which again maynot be an issue.

What have you all done tuning wise to avoid these situations. Why pull timing at 210 degrees if its not needed or richen the mixture if not needed.

Also while we are on it. For those using methanol....Have you thought about moving the ACT sensor to an intake runner?

CMac89
08-18-2010, 10:02 AM
You have to get a QH to do it, Damon!!! It's time.

There are a couple of functions in BE that control that.

Spark vs ECT. You can change the temperature at which the motor starts to pull timing and the amount of timing retard at that temperature.

Spark vs ACT: You can change the temperature of inducted air at which the motor starts to pull timing and the amount of timing retard at that temperature.

These are all total timing minus whatever amount of timing you choose to retard. The computer will pull timing based on the temperature that the sensors output. This means that regardless of your choice in solution, you will get timing retard at the preset parameters.

You can use distillation end points of the Evan's coolant to determine the point at which you should start to pull timing. It'll be higher than conventional coolant, so it's not feasible to waste time on. Run the motor 180* or cooler, and forget about those tables.

XxSlowpokexX
08-18-2010, 07:28 PM
Ill see what I can do with my sct...the is next on the list..Finally got my header bolts....FROM SUMMIT..Jeggs still on backorder

fturner
08-19-2010, 12:58 PM
Just to clarify, the stock tune does not do fuel enrichment based on high ECT's, unless you have deliberately set the function up for that.

I'm with the cmacster.... set the car up with the 180F tstat and set things up to keep the temps around 190. I just recently ran the car on a road course and only once did the temps go over 200 which happened to be on the last set of laps because the snout in blower was starting to sieze up.

Fraser