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View Full Version : NEW Wheels available for 2008



cudaz101
12-23-2007, 11:28 AM
These are two new wheel styles with 3 differant finish options & several staggered size options as well. YES they have the same lip as in the photo. It is a very pronounced lip because of the spoke designs.

They are available in 5-4.25 bolt pattern & anything else you want them drilled to. They come as blanks so they can be drilled to both 5-4.50 & 5-4.25, or 5-120 for your bimmer, or 5-4.75 for your GTO. No Extra charge for Drilling extra bolt patterns.

ALL WHEELS SHIP FREE anywhere in the lower48.

18 X 8.5 +35MM Paint $220ea Chrome $260ea
18 X 9.5 +35MM Paint $235 Chrome $270
19 X 8.5 +35MM Paint $240 Chrome $275
19 X 9.5 +45MM Paint $250 Chrome $285
20 X 10 +45MM Paint $265 Chrome $285
20 X 8.5 +35MM Paint $260 Chrome $275


R930 CHROME
http://www.zoto.com/cudaz101/img/45/37714890eeffe85698af62e9a95499d8.jpg

R930 Hyper Black
http://www.zoto.com/cudaz101/img/45/f469280c304cb1affd2a4e8538bdc24f.jpg

R930 BLACK
http://www.zoto.com/cudaz101/img/45/0e0dbc79fbfa9ceb35b8de23c153162b.jpg


R931 CHROME
http://www.zoto.com/cudaz101/img/45/87bd885fe4e29db32f4011da05352106.jpg

R931 CHROME W/BLACK INSERTS
http://www.zoto.com/cudaz101/img/45/2c5571e98a266e8850cc109b5dad2c4f.jpg

R931 BLACK W/CHROME INSERTS
http://www.zoto.com/cudaz101/img/45/adda85fd933c3075fae19b29152aaf87.jpg


Any questions can be directed to me by Email, PM or within this post.

Cheers,


Brad

Duffy Floyd
12-23-2007, 11:48 AM
Some interesting wheel choices. How come nothing in a suitable 17" size? I prefer to keep some sidewalls on my tires for ride quality.

cudaz101
12-23-2007, 12:14 PM
Some interesting wheel choices. How come nothing in a suitable 17" size? I prefer to keep some sidewalls on my tires for ride quality.

Duffy,
With these wheels I have little input with respect to any of the manufacturing decisions.

To put a few things in perspective though...17" tire sizes in a stock height option is somewhat hard to come by if you want choices and value in your tire purchase. Also with a wheel option like these being staggered sets, the closest option to stock would be a 255-45-17/285-40-17 which .60" from being stock height. Take that into consideration and your sidewall height is the same as a 245-45-18/275-40-18. So there goes part of the whole stigma about sidewalls being too short. Unless you go with a 245-50-17 and then IMO you are not gaining a whole lot of sidewall and you could have achieved that with a 255-45-18 (.40" taller than stock) which is a tire size becoming more popular among manufacturers. That was a mouthfull...


Brad

Duffy Floyd
12-23-2007, 12:57 PM
Brad,

Was not criticizing just lamenting the lack of 17" wheel options. Personally I would not be interested in a staggered set of wheels due to the change of handling characteristics that are possible when the front and rear tires are of different size.

I am running 255/50/17 for summer tires now and 225/55/17 for winter. I am looking at going to a 55 series for summers as well. All I can tell you is for me my winter tires have a better ride feel than my summers which is sad IMHO. Each time I have restored some sidewall by going to a higher series tire the impact harshness has reduced considerably. I have now run 245/24/17 (two different tires) , 255/50/17 and now 225/55/17 on the same car with the same springs and shocks. It is not mearly a measurement of sidewall height that is at play here. It is the relationship between tire width and sidewall height that is the factor. By measurement my 255/50's have a similar sidewall height to the 225/55 but they ride very differently.

cudaz101
12-23-2007, 01:27 PM
Brad,

Was not criticizing just lamenting the lack of 17" wheel options. Personally I would not be interested in a staggered set of wheels due to the change of handling characteristics that are possible when the front and rear tires are of different size.

I am running 255/50/17 for summer tires now and 225/55/17 for winter. I am looking at going to a 55 series for summers as well. All I can tell you is for me my winter tires have a better ride feel than my summers which is sad IMHO. Each time I have restored some sidewall by going to a higher series tire the impact harshness has reduced considerably. I have now run 245/24/17 (two different tires) , 255/50/17 and now 225/55/17 on the same car with the same springs and shocks. It is not mearly a measurement of sidewall height that is at play here. It is the relationship between tire width and sidewall height that is the factor. By measurement my 255/50's have a similar sidewall height to the 225/55 but they ride very differently.


Duffy I would never accuse you of Criticizing. I don't see where I came off as upset in my reply. Regardless, your being left wanting is not without company on this. I was just trying to spin it in another more posative direction as well as giving some lite as to why 17" options are coming less common.

The 255-50-17 & 225-55-17 are almost dead on exact in sidewall height(.10" differance). Which should give similar feel at hwy cruise speed. Every other aspect is going to be differant becasue of the width of the tire. It would be no surprise that the wider tire is more harsh making more of a contact patch to the road giving you more feel.

I have a few 17" wheel options and have even considered more but its a challenge with the manufacturers out there and coming up with something that does'nt have a import/fwd look to it...So outside of Mustang Replicas its been tough.

Cheers,

Brad

fast Ed
12-23-2007, 01:41 PM
Brad, apologies for taking this thread off topic, but it may help some people when they are considering what sizing to go with for aftermarket wheels and tires on their cars. As you well know, there are a lot of misconceptions out there.


Duffy, as you probably realize, tire brand and model can make a big difference in ride characteristics as well. IIRC, your 255/50R17 are BFG KDW tires ... those tend more towards good grip and handling, partially from added sidewall stiffness, than some other performance tires. Shorter sidewall alone doesn't automatically mean a stiffer ride.

To give you a few examples ... when I put 18" wheels on my 68 Cougar a few years ago, one thing I was afraid of was ending up with a crappy ride due to the short sidewalls, especially on an old car designed for 78 or 70 series rubber. I was looking at 225/45R18 and 245/45R18 to get the overall diameter I was after. I managed to score a used set of Michelin Pilot Sport tires off eBay in those sizes for a good price. I knew that these particular Michelins had a more flexible sidewall with a bit narrower tread width than some other performance tires, and they worked out nicely on the Cougar ... very decent ride for having such short sidewalls in the front. Should also mention that car has Konis in it, which certainly helps. The narrower tread, with more of a rounded shoulder, compared to a very square shoulder as found on some of the performance tires like a lot of the BFGs, potentially gives up a bit of dry grip, in return for less of tendency to grab the ruts in the road, or "tramline" as the Brits call it.

As far as MN12s go, this summer as you know I switched my 95 up to 19" rims and rubber, replacing the 18s that had been on the car for 5 summers. Again, I was a bit leery that the shorter sidewall height would detract from the good ride my car has, but it turned out great. I did go for the high-end Goodyear Eagle F1 GS-D3, which are not cheap, but they are worth the price. Killer grip wet or dry, quiet, and a smooth ride, even better than the previous generation GS-D2 18" rubber that came off the car. Generally speaking, you get what you pay for with performance tires, but that's not a hard and fast rule. Some of the high-dollar stuff isn't as great as you would expect, and some of the lower priced tires perform better than you might think when you consider the cost.

Car & Driver did a fairly in-depth test a few years ago with the help of Tire Rack, you can look at it here:

http://www.caranddriver.com/features/10252/tire-test-the-quick-and-the-tread.html

It will give you an idea of how some tires can be great performers in some aspects, but not so great in others. The test came out in December 2005, so there are some new players in the market since then. In my experience, it always best to put on the very best tires that you can afford. Those 4 little patches of rubber are the only things holding your car or truck from flying off the road!! ;)


cheers
Ed N.

rzibilske77
12-23-2007, 01:57 PM
ok you photoshop pro's...get busy, i would love to see all if possible photoshopped on a sc:p

cudaz101
12-23-2007, 02:26 PM
Not at all Ed...Great information.:)

Brad

Kurt K
12-24-2007, 01:42 PM
Car & Driver did a fairly in-depth test a few years ago with the help of Tire Rack, you can look at it here:

http://www.caranddriver.com/features/10252/tire-test-the-quick-and-the-tread.html

Nice article Ed.

Ira R.
12-24-2007, 02:22 PM
As far as MN12s go, this summer as you know I switched my 95 up to 19" rims and rubber, replacing the 18s that had been on the car for 5 summers. Again, I was a bit leery that the shorter sidewall height would detract from the good ride my car has, but it turned out great. I did go for the high-end Goodyear Eagle F1 GS-D3, which are not cheap, but they are worth the price. Killer grip wet or dry, quiet, and a smooth ride, even better than the previous generation GS-D2 18" rubber that came off the car. Generally speaking, you get what you pay for with performance tires, but that's not a hard and fast rule. Some of the high-dollar stuff isn't as great as you would expect, and some of the lower priced tires perform better than you might think when you consider the cost.

Ed N.

Ed, which size tires did you end up choosing for the new rims?/

Ira

fast Ed
12-24-2007, 06:01 PM
Ira, they are 255/40R19 and 275/35R19. The rears are slightly shorter than the front, but when I first tried it with 245/40R19 on the front, I didn't like the fender gap. The F1 GS-D3 isn't available in a regular 285/35, otherwise I would have gone with that size. I was also looking at the Michelin PS2 and Yokohama Advan Sport in 255 & 285, but one size or the other was on backorder, so I went with the 255 & 275. The 285 would look a bit better on the 10" wheels I'm sure, but I'm still quite pleased with what is on the car.


cheers
Ed N.

Ira R.
12-24-2007, 08:49 PM
Ira, they are 255/40R19 and 275/35R19. The rears are slightly shorter than the front, but when I first tried it with 245/40R19 on the front, I didn't like the fender gap. The F1 GS-D3 isn't available in a regular 285/35, otherwise I would have gone with that size. I was also looking at the Michelin PS2 and Yokohama Advan Sport in 255 & 285, but one size or the other was on backorder, so I went with the 255 & 275. The 285 would look a bit better on the 10" wheels I'm sure, but I'm still quite pleased with what is on the car.


cheers
Ed N.

Thanks for the info. Thinking about options because I am running 245/45/18 Bridgestone Potenza's all around and the ride is much harder then I would like.

Ira

XR7 Dave
12-24-2007, 09:18 PM
What tire pressures do you guys run? :confused:

fast Ed
12-24-2007, 09:51 PM
Usually around 34 to 35 front, and 32 rear. The extra front pressure will help the car to turn in a bit sharper.


cheers
Ed N.

XR7 Dave
12-24-2007, 10:20 PM
I ask because tires have an operating range for tire pressure. Some people think they have to run max pressure which is a practice which contributes to a rough ride. The stock tire pressure for an SC was 30psi and unless you are running a tire with a lower load rating than stock, running 30psi will improve ride quality substantially.

fast Ed
12-24-2007, 10:48 PM
Absolutely. Some people see "42 psi" or whatever on the sidewall, so that's what they put in, rather than looking at the vehicle spec on the door pillar. I run a few pounds higher than stock, to get a bit better handling at the expense of a bit of ride comfort. In the 68 Cougar on the 18s, it gets around 30F and 28R, plenty for high-perf tires on that old turd.


cheers
Ed N.

Duffy Floyd
12-24-2007, 11:02 PM
Tire pressure does definately impact the impact harness and shake of the tires. But looking at the pillar sticker for selection of a tire pressure is not necessarily the way to go. Works fine for a stock tire size but as you go wider and shorter side wall the air volume of the tire changes. So you need to compensate for that in the pressure you select. Normally plus sizing tires and wheels mean you should be using up to 3 PSI more pressure than the OEM recommended cold pressure.

I usually run 32 PSI on all four corners.

XR7 Dave
12-25-2007, 01:09 AM
Tire pressure does definately impact the impact harness and shake of the tires. But looking at the pillar sticker for selection of a tire pressure is not necessarily the way to go. Works fine for a stock tire size but as you go wider and shorter side wall the air volume of the tire changes. So you need to compensate for that in the pressure you select. Normally plus sizing tires and wheels mean you should be using up to 3 PSI more pressure than the OEM recommended cold pressure.

I usually run 32 PSI on all four corners.

Where do you get this information? This is not something consistent with my experience although I wouldn't consider 32psi to be excessive.

Duffy Floyd
12-25-2007, 12:29 PM
I called BFG when I installed the KDWS tires on my car. But here is one place that talks about upping pressure 3 PSI for aspect ratios lower than 60.

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Tires-2359/Upsizing-Tire-pressure-1.htm

Ira R.
12-25-2007, 12:36 PM
Remember too that all formulas aside, it is also a matter of feel. It's not as if we get to test track these tires so we have to go by the seat of the pants method. That being said, I find that in order to soften the ride to my liking I have to go down to 28psi all around and the car still seems to handle well. In fact it feels as if it may have lost some oversteer as well.

Ira

fast Ed
12-25-2007, 06:16 PM
Duffy's point is certainly valid. The easiest way to judge if extra pressure is needed on lower profile tires would be to compare the manufacturer's data for the particular size, the load rating specifically, with the rating for the stock 225/60R16 size, which is usually ~1650 lbs. at max. inflation. With the added width of the tires many of us are using, there is still a large enough air pocket to give close to the same load rating.

Generally it only starts to get a bit scary when people choose large wheel diameters combined with tire section width close to stock, and low sidewalls. An example would be something like a 235/40 or 245/40/18 that I've seen some people put on an SC. I'd definitely want some extra pressure in something like that, to make sure the tire has enough capacity to hold up a big turd of a car like ours.


cheers
Ed N.

XR7 Dave
12-25-2007, 07:22 PM
Exactly. If you read the link referenced by Duffy, the guy talks about load index. The load index is on the tire next to the speed rating. 99W, 96H, etc. The original V rated 225/60/16 will typically have a load index rating of 97V-98W. A Z or W rated 255/45/17 will have a similar 98W or 98Y rating which means that there is no change in pressure recommended for this tire and a 255/40/18 will typically have a 99Y rating although some have a 95Y rating. Again, not all tires are created equal. The 16" and 17" tires have roughly the same load capacity but you'll notice that the 99Y rated 18's have a higher load capacity than stock.

This doesn't mean that you can't increase tire pressures but it clearly indicates there is no need to do so and it also shows why some 18" tires ride very hard with even stock air pressures whereas others do not.

cudaz101
01-02-2008, 12:37 AM
So anyways....We still got these wheels over here..;)

Great tire information though. I have been an active member here for a long time and have often wondered why the SCCoA does not have a forum dedicated to Tire, Wheels??

Duffy???haha:p

Brad

fturner
01-03-2008, 11:12 PM
Ok, so say I go with the 18's with the idea of the 8.5's on front and the 9.5's out back.... what would be a good tire size and tire to keep the diameter close to stock and fill the wells nicely?

I shudder at what the shipping costs would be to Canada though :eek:.

cudaz101
01-04-2008, 01:32 AM
Ok, so say I go with the 18's with the idea of the 8.5's on front and the 9.5's out back.... what would be a good tire size and tire to keep the diameter close to stock and fill the wells nicely?

I shudder at what the shipping costs would be to Canada though :eek:.


A 245-45-18/275-40-18 combination would be perfect with respect to both, height & width with that staggered set.

We work with CAN residents on shipping to try and keep cost down. We give a $60 credit with the purchase of a wheel set, to use towards your freight costs.

Cheers,

Brad

IdoXLr8
01-20-2008, 12:09 PM
So when are we going to see these on your car, Brad? :D

tbirdaj
01-27-2008, 12:03 AM
Brad,

It's nice to see you got the RUFF wheels available now. Maybe after I stop dinking around with my expedition I'll have to grab a set from you for the bird. I'll P.M. you my new #.

Pablo94SC
02-05-2008, 12:06 AM
I anyone is interested, I did the math and IIRC, an 18" wheel with 255/50s and a 3.73 out back (auto) is equivilent to running 3.55 rear gears. The extra sidewall will give you a slightly more comfortable ride and the extra height will probably give better gas mileage while crusing the streets. At the track though, you'll get the full benefit of the 3.73s if you're running a set of slicks or drag radials. Just a thought I'd throw out. To me, this seems like a very good compromise for performance and streetability.

90MN12
02-08-2008, 03:59 AM
Do You Have Any Cobras In All Black?

94 sc
02-09-2008, 02:22 AM
that sounds like a nice tire combo front and back. so how much would it cost to get the black rims with chrome accents with the tire combonation you suggested up to Vancouver Canada ?

supercoupe519
03-08-2008, 06:09 PM
18x8.5 R930 Hyper Black
How much for 4 rims shipped to Windsor, Ontario Canada.

cudaz101
03-17-2008, 05:13 PM
Everything is now in stock and readily available. So whenever you are ready to place your orders Hit us up at the shop number or email/PM me.

Cheers,

Brad

Belisarius
07-31-2008, 03:15 AM
Regarding tire pressures, my friend drives an E39 BMW M5 (E39 means the model just before the current one), and regularly ran higher pressures because he drives hard and participates in track days. That is until he measured the tread temperatures after some hard laps. He found he was overinflating. With him, the instructor and a full tank the car came in at 4,800 pounds; I don't recall off the top of my head what the tire/rim combo is but I'm pretty sure they're 19" 255/35 or some such so his sidewall height with a heavy car issues are worse than ours. I don't remember what his final pressures were but I think they were even lower than the manufacturer specs.

Needless to say, the only way to tell if your tire pressures are right with the tire/rim combination that is on the car is to drive the car hard and then measure the tread temps across the tire. The readings should be as even as possible all across the tread. An underinflated tire will be hot on the outside and cooler in the middle of the tread. An over inflated tire just the opposite. An overinflated tire will balloon out in the center of the tread, have lower rolling resistance, slightly harsher ride and be less responsive. An underinflated tire will have greater slip angles and wear more on the outside edges of the tire.

No tire pressure numbers you see here will be of any use at all to anyone unless they are running the exact same combination of wheel, tire and tire model number on their car and have measured thier tires after heating them up via some hot laps or hard driving.

David