1993 Thunderbird SC ( 62,533 miles )

BrandonQ1995

Registered User
Just grabbed myself a 93 SC, a dream car of mine since I was a little kid watching drag races in Hunt's Point with my father. I'm currently overseas for work when I found this gem with decent miles and near perfect exterior. So, I haven't been able to drive it myself just yet, and won't be able to for a few more months. But, according to the car fax, it's been likely sitting in storage with only a couple hundred miles ran over the past 3 years. Any advice on what the first things I should look at, dealing with a 30 year old SC such as this? Thanks!
 

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Just grabbed myself a 93 SC, a dream car of mine since I was a little kid watching drag races in Hunt's Point with my father. I'm currently overseas for work when I found this gem with decent miles and near perfect exterior. So, I haven't been able to drive it myself just yet, and won't be able to for a few more months. But, according to the car fax, it's been likely sitting in storage with only a couple hundred miles ran over the past 3 years. Any advice on what the first things I should look at, dealing with a 30 year old SC such as this? Thanks!

Obviously change the oil and filter but I would also do a complete coolant drain and fill or flush. I believe electrolysis in the cooling system is a major factor in head gasket failure on these cars. That and overheating.
 
Yes coolant has limits like all the other fluids, including brake fluid, trans and power steering as well as rear end lube. Jimmy is correct about the electrolysis I've had to replace three heater cores in these cars.
 
Nice looking car, very nice condition paint and no fade on the lights. Looks like it was taken care of. Like the other guys said change all the fluids including the coolant since it can deteriorate the head gaskets from electrolysis. When refilling there is a vent tube on the thermostat housing that needs to be opened to force air out of the system. Once that's done run the car with the heater on high and keep the vent bolt slightly loose until coolant comes out a bit that will help purge any last bit of air in the system. Be careful with the vent bolt though, I"ve had them seize to the tube and when trying to remove the bolt I've twisted the vent tube off the housing. The tube has 6 sides so you can hold it with a wrench when loosening the bleeder bolt. That should prevent it from twisting off. Better safe than sorry.

I'd also run some seafoam or lucas fuel injector cleaner through it and put a fresh inline fuel filter on it. Modern gas with ethanol isn't good to sit for long periods of time.

Also, if this car is an automatic, I would recommend replacing the rubber TV cable bushing on the throttle body with the brass one w/ cotter pin. The rubber ones dry out and deteriorate and cause the TV cable to pop loose and it will cause the transmission to not engage or shift right and you can burn up the transmission in a matter of miles. I've had this happen to one of my SC's. Cheap insurance to prevent a $2000+ trans rebuild bill.
 
Doing the radiator flush now. Had a small leak from Thermostat housing. Anyone know which is the correct Thermostat to get? 180 or 195? Part number would be a help. I live in California so not sure if the 180 will affect smog. Bird always runs a bit warm in the summer with the AC on.
 
195 is correct. Even with a 180 it won't run much cooler due to the fan's not being programmed to kick on until it gets much hotter.
 
Thanks I used a MotoRad 192. It took 3 tries to get the thermostat housing not to leak. I had to finally use Permatex blue before and after applying the Felpro gasket. Only way it would not leak. I scraped the housing / block with a razor blade first then used a rolloc pad on my air grinder. There was some pitting around the housing at the bottom. I guess the RTV sealed that up.
 
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