How to Access Passenger Head Exhaust Manifold Fasteners?

FurryWrecker911

SCCoA Member
Still taking it slowly one hot weekend and Blaster can at a time. Got the driver's side head almost all the way off. Just have to remove the last 4 head bolts and off it comes. NOW THEN, the passenger side. How do I access the exhaust manifold? Just brute force a breaker bar with a deep socket down there and feel around with the other hand? Disconnect the lines and pull them all to the side? What's you guys's take on this because I don't want to break anything while flying blind.

Side note: Fuel rail still attached. I just have it pulled up and to the left in the photo which is why it looks weird.

Screenshot_20200829-173622_Video Player.jpg
 

Kurt K

SCCoA Member
I haven't had exhaust manifolds for a very long time, but I've changed headers a few times. Anyway, they should all be accessible from the top. A 6-point box end wrench may help you break the bolts or nut loose. A swivel-head ratchet might help too.

You can work around the AC hoses and maybe the fuel lines. You can also snake the wiring harness back from the front of the engine and throttle body towards the passenger side hood hinge.
 
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35th

Registered User
Just a question so don't beat me up I've never done it but I'm probably going to be facing a head gasket job on mine and I was wondering could you/is possible to disconnect the Y pipe under the car and pull the manifold off with the head and then separate is there a reason that's not possible seems like it would be easier to deal with the manifold and head external of the engine bay and strut towers just a thought as I said I haven't tried that but saw this and figured it would be a good time to ask
 

KMT

Registered User
How do I access the exhaust manifold?]

I would remove the pass. side accessory bracket at this point - the one that holds the jackshaft and that the DIS module sits on...unbolt the A/C compressor and just lay it to the side. Remove the belts, mark the tensioners for location and remove them. Remove the jackshaft pulley too...bolts might be easier to deal with when the belts are still on. Also the plastic auto shock cover.

With the large/heavy accy. bracket out of the way, you'll have a clearer view of what you're up against. Might have to do one or two towards the rear from below.
 
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blue-94

Registered User
I would remove the pass. side accessory bracket at this point - the one that holds the jackshaft and that the DIS module sits on...unbolt the A/C compressor and just lay it to the side. Remove the belts, mark the tensioners for location and remove them. Remove the jackshaft pulley too...bolts might be easier to deal with when the belts are still on. Also the plastic auto shock cover.

With the large/heavy accy. bracket out of the way, you'll have a clearer view of what you're up against. Might have to do one or two towards the rear from below.

What KMT said
+
Get the valve cover off and outta way You will see everything. I sprayed mine with blaster every day. They came off easy. It looks like it will tough but it really not. I used a ratchet wrench on one I think
Some are studs with nuts some are bolts. Take lots of pictures.
 

KMT

Registered User
It looks like it will tough but it really not.
Echo that. And yes, valve cover too ;) Pulling the plugs first might help as well.

And if I may make a suggestion to the OP - going this far in provides an opportunity to swap the pass. side early exhaust manifold for late model - we're told it flows better. The pipe below will need to be redone, but the late model manifold is a benefit, I believe.

I did the head gaskets on my '90 Anny in 2018 and wish I'd made that change then. I've since sourced a late model exhaust manifold, and have it on my list to go back in. Good news is the guy that does my exhaust work is only a mile away, so the neighborhood can live with one open manifold for however long that takes, I'm sure.

There were tons of additional things I took care of while doing the heads. Things that would have not been worth it individually, I think that list was over two dozen to-do's long.
 

blue-94

Registered User

Echo that. And yes, valve cover too ;) Pulling the plugs first might help as well.

And if I may make a suggestion to the OP - going this far in provides an opportunity to swap the pass. side early exhaust manifold for late model - we're told it flows better. The pipe below will need to be redone, but the late model manifold is a benefit, I believe.

I did the head gaskets on my '90 Anny in 2018 and wish I'd made that change then. I've since sourced a late model exhaust manifold, and have it on my list to go back in. Good news is the guy that does my exhaust work is only a mile away, so the neighborhood can live with one open manifold for however long that takes, I'm sure.

There were tons of additional things I took care of while doing the heads. Things that would have not been worth it individually, I think that list was over two dozen to-do's long.

You will have to deal with an EGR tube on the 94/95 exhaust manifold. Just an FYI
 

KMT

Registered User
You will have to deal with an EGR tube on the 94/95 exhaust manifold. Just an FYI


Yep, going to blank it off before the manifold goes in, that, or study if it will work as an optional location for a wideband O2 sensor on that side. I already have one on the driver side, but it's below, on the pipe.
 
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