Jeff's 3.8 and 4.2 Projects.

jb351

SCCoA Member
The ARP sticker on it was not just for show apparently as it did have ARP studs on the heads as well as Comp pushrods and a mild cam upgrade over stock.

Some teardown pics.




I managed to set the engine bay slightly on fire while trying to remove the passenger side O2 sensor around this time. It refused to budge so I enlisted some help from my propane torch which ignited a rag near the sensor that I did not see that then ignited the rags and plastic that were keeping the engine covered. I ran to the kitchen and grabbed the fire extinguisher and put the fire out before it got really bad but in doing so I covered the engine bay and now partially exposed short block with dry chemical extinguisher powered. That was not fun to clean up and that stuff got everywhere and into everything. The only damage was some half melted wiring harness connectors which I have since replaced.
That broken plug was a miserable bastard to remove even with the head off the car and on the bench. There was no way that was coming out in the car. It mostly came out in pieces and flakes of steel and every one of them put up a fight and I had to put a threaded insert in after finally getting it all out.

Since the top end was apart anyway I might as well give it a work over and do some porting. Again, so much for the quick repair job....
The heads were in pretty good shape and I forcefully restrained myself with limited success from going too crazy with them. After cleaning them up I put them in the milling machine and roughed out a gasket/port match 1 inch deep in each intake port before manually finishing them with carbide burrs and sanding rolls. The rest of the intake port just got a light going over to clean up the rough stuff as well as some bowl work. The exhaust side was gasket matched and ported/polished by hand, they were not put in the mill. The exhaust side had some bowl work as well.
The combustion chambers were opened up a bit to unshroud the valves and then polished. The valves were then lapped into the seats and vacuum tested to check the seal. Some new seals and paint and they were ready to go back on.
They were reinstalled with MLS gaskets and copper gasket spray.







 

jb351

SCCoA Member
Around the same time while I was working on the heads I finally had enough of the yellowed headlights and cleaned them up with a cheap Simoniz kit from Canadian Tire and a sheet of #1000 and #1500 wet/dry sandpaper. The kit only came with #2000, #3000 and #4000 grit as well as some polish so I used the #1000 and #1500 to remove the heavier stuff before starting the kit. Looks much better now.





 

jb351

SCCoA Member
Since the heads got worked over the intake manifold and exhaust manifolds needed some attention as well. I had more pictures of these in process and completed but I can't seem to find them. Much like the heads the intake manifold was port/gasket matched 1 inch deep on the milling machine and then finished by hand with some other work done on the inlet side. The exhaust manifolds were resurfaced and the outlets were opened up to 2 inches.



For the supercharger I did not use the one that came on it and instead used the one I worked over previously in this thread and installed the 5% pulley that the car came with. I did add a spacer to the superchargers outlet though, probably not really needed yet but what's one more thing at this point anyway.





It received some hand blending and paint after that.

Decision time, do I take the easy road and a stock ported blower inlet and throttle body to get it running quicker or do I go all in on the hard way and use the inlet I heavily modified to use a Cobra throttle body with and see if I can get it all to work? Hard way it is! It took quite a bit of work to get it all to fit properly and some fittings and clearance had to be added in places as well as a spacer. I also had to make a throttle cable ball for it to work with the stock SC throttle linkage as well as pivot to fix the linkage geometry. A 2003 Cobra TPS sensor was used and slotted to allow for adjustment and it's matching connector was installed on the wiring harness. As there was now no IAC provision anywhere I made an remote adapter and installed fittings on the modified throttle body and spacer. I also made and installed an IAC adjuster after seeing one online.

I don't have a photo of the IAC adapter or adjuster so here are CAD drawings.
 

jb351

SCCoA Member
The induction system is mostly back together now at this point. The oil filler inlet had to be modified as well as you can see.


So the next question is how to I adapt the throttle body to the MAF sensor and air filter? There are silicone boots out there for that throttle body but they are expensive and probably not the right angle I need so I guess I need to make one.

I designed one in Fusion360 and printed it on my 3D printer with a flexible TPU filament.





So, that worked but it did not fit so on to rev 2. I printed some with the angles and clearance I needed as well cut and welded up some 3.5" aluminum pipe to make a tube.
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Being able to print them saved me a lot of time and money. It only took a few hours to make each one with a material cost of around $4 at worst. Sure beats spending lots of money and waiting for shipping for a part that may not fit.
 

jb351

SCCoA Member
An air/oil separator was on my hit list next to keep the oil out of the now very clean intake system. I bought a cheap one from Amazon and went about modifying it. Stock it was just a can with 2 fittings at the top and no filtering media or separation. I added both to it.







I still have the stock 70mm MAF sensor and will change it eventually so I made myself a housing to try out one of these days. That will likely wait until I pick up a Quarterhorse though, there is also a set of 42lb injectors on the shelf to go along with it. I have the measurements/specs for different sample tubes and can print any size I need or want to try on my 3D printer. I don't have high expectations for it but I like making things so I made one anyway. I don't seem to have a finished picture after I machined the sensor holes. I'll get one later. The weld area needs a bit of blending as well.

 

jb351

SCCoA Member
I made up some outer rocker panels over the winter. I only had access to a 24" sheet metal brake and since I was going to make them full length I had to bend up a total of 8 sections (4 per side) and weld them together to form a long panel. Literally 2 days after I did this I found out that there is an HVAC shop near me that bends up rocker panels on a large metal brake for not much more than I paid for the sheet metal.



I pulled the interior of it out yesterday and it is much worse that I initially though and I expected it to be bad. The entire floor and most of the crossmembers are beyond saving and are going to have to be replaced in addition to the rocker panels. It did not look that bad from underneath but it is. There was even a pool of water in the passenger footwells with the wiring harness sitting in it. This is despite it being under a car cover, granted the car cover has a hole where the antenna poked through so I guess that is where it got it. It has been rotting from the inside out for years before I got it. It is much worse in person than the photos show. This is becoming a restoration project that I did not plan on dealing with for a few years time.

 
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