Jeff's 3.8 and 4.2 Projects.

jb351

SCCoA Member
Attached here is an outer rocker panel template that I made up for anyone looking to make a patch panel. Print it at 100% with no page scaling on 8.5" x 11" paper. After it's printed you can cut it out along the inside edge and check the fit on yours and trim as necessary. I tested it yesterday on mine and the cutout fit very well but then again that panel was the basis for the template. The template was made from a piece of wire bent to the profile and then it was scanned and worked over in Fusion360 a bit. The sharpness of the bends will depend on the person/metal brake doing the bending.
 

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  • Rocker Panel R1.pdf
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jb351

SCCoA Member
Made some tweaks to the sub-frame bushings prototypes and got them where I'm happy with them. Need to order material for them this week. Figured I might as well order material to make every other bushing for the car at the same time to save on the shipping costs later.



Welded in some support structure to help keep the body from moving too much while I work on the floor and rockers. I'm going to do it section by section and not chop the whole thing out but better safe than sorry. It's welded to the rear wheel well area as well as the A pillar, B pillar and transmission tunnel. When it's done I'll make it into subframe connectors and braces.


I already knew the car was beat on hard before but seeing this after removing the seam sealer at the rear floor footwell section confirms it. The body was flexing enough to start tearing the spot welds.


Started the process of removing the rear floor crossmember, part of it is getting replaced and it was in the way of rusted floor. Took a break to start painting up some suspension parts after they were cleaned up. I picked up white rust paint instead of black by mistake so the first couple coats are going to be white and I'll topcoat it black later or maybe keep it white, who knows?

 

Scott Long

Registered User
Wow just read through this whole thread. Lots of impressive custom work. You are like me, you pick a car that needs work and by the time you finish you could have just saved a bit longer and bought a better car to start with. Hope you plan to keep this car forever because even though you count your own labor as free, you will never get back what you have invested from a time or money stand point.

I wish I had half of the fabrication skills and metal work skills you have. Keep us updated on the progress.
 

jb351

SCCoA Member
Wow just read through this whole thread. Lots of impressive custom work. You are like me, you pick a car that needs work and by the time you finish you could have just saved a bit longer and bought a better car to start with. Hope you plan to keep this car forever because even though you count your own labor as free, you will never get back what you have invested from a time or money stand point.

I wish I had half of the fabrication skills and metal work skills you have. Keep us updated on the progress.
Thanks. I knew the car needed some work when I bought it but that went down hill quickly. The original plan was just to fix the floor, rockers and a basic tune up and drive it this summer. Then the spark plug broke and I found out how utterly f'ed the car was and now I'm into a driveway based partial restoration. A lot of the fun for me is in the troubleshooting, designing new parts and then making them. I am the product of a childhood full of Legos.

I have no plans to sell it and if I could not do the work myself there would be no hope for it but I am enjoying the challenge of saving it from what would probably have been the junkyard and bringing it back to life again. I feel these cars are worth the effort and time but there are some days I am sure my wife tires of me shaking my head and saying "why couldn't I be a Mustang guy? They have it so easy with parts" but overall, at least for me it is much more fun to build horsepower and upgrades than to just buy them from a catalogue. My mental "to-do" list for this grows by the day. For example I seem some gated shifters on Youtube and though that would be cool so I did a rough CAD model for one to fit a 89-93 console that I will circle back around to that eventually after the car is mobile again or I see something cool here on the forum or facebook, same thing happens. Hard to stay focused sometimes.

Today I started wire brushing the rust and grime off the rear subframe so I can reinforce it and paint it. I think my subframe was welded on either a Friday afternoon before a holiday or the Monday morning right after one based on the nasty welds. So much porosity and inconsistent bead placement, oh well. I had to weld it up anyway so what's a bit more at this point.

Some of the welding porosity.

 

davec73

SCCoA Member
Thanks. I knew the car needed some work when I bought it but that went down hill quickly. The original plan was just to fix the floor, rockers and a basic tune up and drive it this summer. Then the spark plug broke and I found out how utterly f'ed the car was and now I'm into a driveway based partial restoration. A lot of the fun for me is in the troubleshooting, designing new parts and then making them. I am the product of a childhood full of Legos.

I have no plans to sell it and if I could not do the work myself there would be no hope for it but I am enjoying the challenge of saving it from what would probably have been the junkyard and bringing it back to life again. I feel these cars are worth the effort and time but there are some days I am sure my wife tires of me shaking my head and saying "why couldn't I be a Mustang guy? They have it so easy with parts" but overall, at least for me it is much more fun to build horsepower and upgrades than to just buy them from a catalogue. My mental "to-do" list for this grows by the day. For example I seem some gated shifters on Youtube and though that would be cool so I did a rough CAD model for one to fit a 89-93 console that I will circle back around to that eventually after the car is mobile again or I see something cool here on the forum or facebook, same thing happens. Hard to stay focused sometimes.

Today I started wire brushing the rust and grime off the rear subframe so I can reinforce it and paint it. I think my subframe was welded on either a Friday afternoon before a holiday or the Monday morning right after one based on the nasty welds. So much porosity and inconsistent bead placement, oh well. I had to weld it up anyway so what's a bit more at this point.

Some of the welding porosity.

Always an adventure! I'd be interested in doing one of those intakes on my car it has a 4.2 and 2.1 kenne bell
 

jb351

SCCoA Member
Always an adventure! I'd be interested in doing one of those intakes on my car it has a 4.2 and 2.1 kenne bell
That split-port intake is something I still think about often and want to get back to it after I get the car mostly sorted and mobile again. There are some things that I have learned since the first go at it that I would change about it.
 

jb351

SCCoA Member
Last month I got the rear subframe cleaned up with some seam welding and bracing added. It's back home now and living in my basement until it's time to re-install it.



More spot welds were found tearing and popping as well as some non-factory ripples in the driver side floor.


Some photos of being in the process of removing floor sections.
 

jb351

SCCoA Member
I started working on getting the outer rocker panels I had previously made cut to size and fitted.


So....Much....Rust.......
I had to pull the fenders off to get access to some of this so of course, the bottom of the fenders will be rusted as well.



A couple more photos. The wood you see in the photo is from a pallet under the car that I fasten my car cover to that works very well as a tie down point.


Pulled the front rotors off and cleaned them up in the lathe. I didn't need to take much off of them per side to clean them up.


I finally got the material to make up the rear subframe bushings. The grey one is a 3D printed prototype. The white UHMW is all cut up now into bushing sized chunks.


The replacement panels for the floor/inner rockers and supports are in the process of being built in the basement when I have time so hopefully I'll have some of it done by the end of the weekend. The metal is all cut for it and I just need to finish it on the brake and bead roller. I am really, really wishing I had listened to that voice in my head that wanted me to buy a plasma cutter for the last number of months. I ignored it and spent way too much time cutting a lot of sheet metal with a grinder in my driveway with a ground level pallet as the workbench. Lesson learned, don't ignore any excuse or reason to buy more tools.
 

jb351

SCCoA Member
Wow, just wow, amazing work! Makes me want to tackle my tbird projects. Work has consumed all my time lately.

Thanks. Once you get started on it I find it helps to do something each day for it even if it's something small and only a few minutes such as taking a measurement, research, cut a piece of metal etc. It's not always easy and doesn't always happen but it helps me keep the ball rolling so to speak.
 

935sp33d

Registered User
Thanks. Once you get started on it I find it helps to do something each day for it even if it's something small and only a few minutes such as taking a measurement, research, cut a piece of metal etc. It's not always easy and doesn't always happen but it helps me keep the ball rolling so to speak.
Doesn't help that my birds are spread out in different property's. Plus I recently bought another project so I want get that finished before I tackle my tbird ressurections lol
 

jb351

SCCoA Member
Finally got the rear subframe bushings made for it and they turned out well and fit good. I didn't have any round bar for the center section of the bushing but I did have hex stock aluminum so I used that instead and machined the hex into the UHMW to match and the tool radius on to the hex stock. Most of it was done on a CNC mill and then I machined the final finish cut on the lathe. Saved a lot of time doing it this way.







I plan on upgrading the rear brakes eventually and made some brackets for when the time comes. Mostly went by pictures and measurements on the internet but it seems correct. I'll have to grab rotors from Rock Auto next time I order and see if anything needs changing but I think it should be fine. Made the prototype on the 3D printer before committing to doing it in metal.


 
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